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Schedule of Exhibitions
Through December 2015

EDITORS PLEASE NOTE: Information provided below is subject to change. To confirm scheduling and dates, call the Communications Department at (212) 570-3951. CONTACT NUMBER FOR USE IN TEXT IS (212) 535-7710.


Of Special Note: Information on the first season of programming at The Met Breuer—opening March 10, 2016—is now available at www.metmuseum.org/MetBreuer.

UPCOMING
Exhibitions
Continuing Exhibitions and Installations
Asian Art 100
Upcoming
Continuing
New Galleries
Chronological List of Exhibitions



Jacqueline de Ribes: The Art of Style
November 19, 2015–February 21, 2016

The Costume Institute’s fall 2015 exhibition will focus on the internationally renowned style icon Countess Jacqueline de Ribes, whose originality and elegance established her as one of the most celebrated fashion personas of the 20th century. The thematic show will feature about 60 ensembles of haute couture and ready-to-wear primarily from de Ribes’s personal archive, dating from 1959 to the present. Also included will be her creations for fancy dress balls, which she often made by cutting up and cannibalizing her haute couture gowns to create nuanced expressions of her aesthetic. These, along with photographs and ephemera, will tell the story of how her interest in fashion developed over decades, from childhood “dress-up” to the epitome of international style.
Press Preview: Tuesday, November 17, 10:00 a.m.–noon
#JacquelinedeRibes

Artistic Furniture of The Gilded Age
In three parts, all opening December 15, 2015

  • Worsham-Rockefeller Dressing Room (permanent installation): December 15, 2015
  • George A. Schastey (special exhibition): December 15, 2015–May 1, 2016
  • Herter Brothers and the William H. Vanderbilt House (gallery installation): December 15, 2015–May 1, 2016
The centerpiece of this three-part exhibition is a sumptuous Aesthetic-style dressing room (1881–82) that was part of a larger commission for Arabella Worsham. She then sold her West 54th Street house and its furnishings to John D. Rockefeller, who made few subsequent changes. The Worsham-Rockefeller Dressing Room has found new life at the Metropolitan, where it provides fresh insight into the luxurious and artistic interiors found in New York’s wealthiest households in the late 19th century. The exhibition’s second part will focus on the dressing room’s designer, George A. Schastey (1839–1894), who, although little-known today, operated one of the largest and most successful decorating firms of the time. Some 15 to 20 works by or attributed to Schastey will be shown near another five examples by rival firms such as Herter Brothers, Pottier & Stymus, and Herts to demonstrate the quality of his work. The unique atmosphere created by New York’s esteemed Gilded Age decorating firms will be demonstrated in a new gallery installation on Herter Brothers’ most important commission, the William H. Vanderbilt House, highlighting several new discoveries. Completed in 1882, the Vanderbilt commission dates to precisely the same moment as the Worsham-Rockefeller Dressing Room.
Artistic Furniture of the Gilded Age: George A. Schastey is made possible by the Enterprise Holdings Endowment and The Peter Jay Sharp Foundation.
Accompanied by a Bulletin.
Press Preview: Monday, December 14, 10:00 a.m.–noon
#GildedAgeFurniture



Asian Art 100
One-year centennial celebration

2015 marks the centennial of the Metropolitan Museum’s Department of Asian Art. In the Year of the Ram, which officially began during Lunar New Year in February 2015, the department is presenting 19 exhibitions and installations organized for a one-year celebration of its formidable holdings of art from across Asia. The department today oversees more than 50 galleries and one of the most comprehensive collections of Asian art anywhere in the world.
In fall 2015, the Asian Art 100 celebration will include the following exhibitions and installations.

Upcoming:

Encountering Vishnu: The Lion Avatar in Indian Temple Drama;
December 19, 2015–June 5, 2016




The Luxury of Time: European Clocks and Watches
November 16, 2015–March 27, 2016

This installation will draw upon the Museum’s extensive holdings of French, English, Dutch, German, and Swiss horological instruments from the 16th through the 19th century and focus on their decorative qualities. While some of the objects have not been on view for nearly a decade, others will be familiar to visitors who have seen them in the galleries of European Sculpture and Decorative Arts. A newly acquired automaton clock made in Nuremberg in the 17th century will be featured prominently in the installation.
Accompanied by a collection catalogue.
#LuxuryofTime

Girolamo dai Libri and Veronese Art of the Sixteenth Century
November 16, 2015–February 7, 2016

Centered around a large altarpiece on loan to the Robert Lehman Collection from the Department of European Paintings—the monumental Madonna and Child with Saints by Girolamo dai Libri (Italian, Verona, 1474-1555)—this installation will unite several manuscript illuminations by the master and contemporary Veronese illuminators, as well as a selection of 16th-century Veronese drawings.;
#GirolamodaiLibri

American and European Embroidered Samplers, 1600–1900
November 16, 2015–February 15, 2016

This installation will highlight examples from the Museum’s holdings of embroidered samplers made by school girls and young women. Each maker’s skill and creativity was tempered by her adherence to traditional patterns, reflecting the conservative nature of female education at all levels of society. The installation is designed to complement Fashion and Virtue: Textile Patterns and the Print Revolution, 1520–1620 (October 19, 2015– January 10, 2016).
#EmbroideredSamplers

Design for Eternity: Architectural Models from the Ancient Americas
October 26, 2015—September 18, 2016

From the first millennium B.C. until the arrival of Europeans in the 16th century, artists from the ancient Americas created small-scale sculptures representing buildings to be placed in the tombs of important individuals. These works in stone, ceramic, wood, and metal range from highly abstracted representations of temples and houses to elaborate architectural complexes populated with figures conveying a rich sense of ancient ritual and daily life. Often called models, these miniature structures were critical components in funerary practice and beliefs about an afterlife. This exhibition, the first of its kind in the United States, will provide new insights into ancient American architectural design and will shed light on the role of models in mediating relationships between the living, the dead, and the divine.
The exhibition is made possible by The Pearson-Rappaport Foundation in honor of Joanne Pearson.
Additional support provided by the Friends of the Department of the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas.
Accompanied by a publication.
#DesignforEternity

Fashion and Virtue: Textile Patterns and the Print Revolution, 1520–1620
October 20, 2015–January 10, 2016

Printed sources related to the design of textile patterns first appeared during the Renaissance. Six intricate interlaced designs, attributed to Leonardo da Vinci and later copied by Albrecht Dürer, stood at the beginning of a fruitful international exchange of pattern designs through print. From the 1520s, small booklets with textile patterns were published regularly. These pocket-sized, easy-to-use publications became an instant success and essentially formed the first fashion publications. This interdisciplinary exhibition, drawn largely from the Metropolitan Museum’s own collections, combines printed pattern books, drawings, textile samples, costumes, paintings, and various other works of art to evoke the colorful world in which the Renaissance textile pattern books first emerged and functioned.
The exhibition is made possible by the Placido Arango Fund and the William Randolph Hearst Foundation.
Accompanied by a Bulletin.
#FashionandVirtue

Andrea del Sarto’s Borgherini Holy Family
October 14, 2015–January 10, 2016

This focused exhibition will present new findings on Andrea del Sarto’s Holy Family with the Young Saint John the Baptist, one of the Metropolitan Museum’s greatest paintings of the Italian Renaissance. It will be shown alongside Andrea del Sarto’s Charity (from the National Gallery, Washington, D.C.), a closely related painting that was probably generated from the same cartoon. The installation will allow visitors to follow the artist’s approach as he moved from drawings on paper to the preparatory under drawing on the panel, and then to the final painting, emphasizing the crucial role of drawings and cartoons in his workshop. The exhibition will complement a more extensive survey of the artist’s work, Andrea del Sarto: The Renaissance Workshop in Action, that will be on view at The Frick Collection at the same time.
#AndreadelSarto

Ancient Egypt Transformed: The Middle Kingdom
October 12, 2015–January 24, 2016

Ancient Egypt TransformedArguably the least known of ancient Egypt’s major eras, the Middle Kingdom (ca. 2030–1650 B.C.) was a transformational period. It was an age when artistic conventions, cultural principles, religious beliefs, and political systems that were first conceived and instituted during the Old Kingdom (from ca. 2650 B.C.) were revived and reimagined. The period also saw the creation of powerful and compelling works of art rendered with great subtlety and sensitivity. The opening sections of this exhibition will include the distinctive early Middle Kingdom artistic traditions that arose in the south, the subsequent return to Egypt’s traditional capital in the north, and the renewed construction of pyramid complexes. Art created for different layers of Egyptian society will include sculpture and reliefs that depict the pharaoh, the women of his family, and his courtiers. The vital role of the family, including significant objects created by non-elite communities, will also be examined. Egypt’s relations with foreign lands will be explored, and the importance of literature visualized. Magnificent objects created for tombs, chapels, and temples reflect particular Middle Kingdom religious beliefs and practices, such as the pilgrimage to the holy city of Abydos.
The exhibition is made possible by Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman.
Additional support is provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Diane Carol Brandt, and The Daniel P. Davison Fund.
#MiddleKingdomEgypt

New Discoveries: Early Liturgical Textiles from Egypt, 200–400
September 23, 2015–September 5, 2016

Iconographic analysis and scientific testing have revealed new information about the meaning and use of two textiles in the Museum’s collection. The first—woven in a loop pile meant to suggest a mosaic—has recently been recognized as a wall hanging for Christian liturgical use. The second—five recently acquired elements from a depiction of the Crossing of the Red Sea as described in the book of Exodus—can be understood as being from a wall hanging for Christian or possibly Jewish use.
#LiturgicalTextiles

Kongo: Power and Majesty
September 18, 2015–January 3, 2016

Kongo: Power and MajestyKongo: Power and MajestyCentral Africa is home to one of the world’s greatest artistic traditions, and this international loan exhibition will explore the region’s art and culture through some 130 works created by Kongo artists between the 16th and early 20th centuries. The earliest works were missives in the form of exquisite ivories sent by Kongo sovereigns to their European counterparts during the Age of Exploration. Inscribed with delicate geometric designs and finely woven raffia fiber textiles adorned with abstract motifs, they were preserved in royal collections with precious and exotic creations from across the globe. These Kongo luxury arts will be seen in relation to the most outstanding figurative traditions produced by master sculptors active in the same region during the 19th century. The exhibition will culminate with 15 of the sensational monumental Power Figures produced in the Chiloango River region at the end of the 19th century, including a landmark creation acquired by the Met in 2008. Drawn from over 50 institutional and private lenders across Europe and the United States, the exhibition will bring a radical new understanding of Africa’s relationship with the West over the last 500 years.
The exhibition is made possible by the Gail and Parker Gilbert Fund and the Diane W. and James E. Burke Fund.
Accompanied by a catalogue.
#KongoPower

In and Out of the Studio: Photographic Portraits from West Africa
August 31, 2015–January 3, 2016

This exhibition will present nearly a century of portrait photography in West Africa through approximately 80 photographs from the Metropolitan Museum’s own holdings (mainly from the Visual Resource Archives in the Department of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas, with additions from the Department of Photographs).
The selection features the works of photographers who were active across West Africa from the 1890s to the 1970s. Among them will be both renowned African photographers such as Malick Sidibé, Seydou Keïta, and Samuel Fosso, and earlier and lesser-known practitioners such as the Lutterodt brothers and Alex A. Acolatse. Whether working inside or outside the studio, the photographers mastered the art of portraiture, capturing their sitters as they skillfully fashioned their own image.
#InandOutoftheStudio

The Aftermath of Conflict: Jo Ractliffe’s Photographs of Angola and South Africa
August 24, 2015–March 6, 2016

This exhibition will present 23 works produced since 2007 by South African artist Jo Ractliffe that show landscapes of Angola and South Africa as sites of conflict and contention. Focusing on the aftermath of the Angolan Civil War and the intertwined conflict known in South Africa as the "Border War," Ractliffe’s photographs reveal the complex traces of the past in the present and address themes of dispossession, history, memory, and erasure. The installation is organized to coincide with the special exhibition Kongo: Power and Majesty opening on September 18. There is a resonance between the two exhibitions that is expressed through their shared focus on colonial histories in Central and Southern Africa, and in their attention to the significance of absence, whether in the landscape or in the archives of art history.
#JoRactliffe

Grand Illusions: Staged Photography from the Met Collection
August 10, 2015—January 18, 2016

Photographers, like ventriloquists, can cast “voices” in a seemingly infinite number of genres and period styles. This does not negate the camera’s direct relationship to the world—tying image to subject as naturally as a footprint—but instead reveals that photographs are always admixtures of fiction and reality tilted toward one end of the scale or the other. Beginning with early photographs and leaving off at the end of the analog era, the installation of 40 works surveys the ways in which photographers invent their images.
#MetGrandIllusions

Arms and Armor: Notable Acquisitions 2003–2014
November 11, 2014–January 3, 2016

Some 30 works from Europe, the United States, Japan, India, and Tibet, acquired between 2003 and 2014, are featured in this exhibition. Beyond the well-established categories of finely decorated armor, edged weapons, and firearms, the selection features works on paper (mainly drawings and prints), lacquer, and textiles, all of which are vital but often overlooked in the understanding and appreciation of arms and armor as a universal art form.

Reimagining Modernism: 1900–1950
Opened September 2014

This reinstallation of the first-floor galleries of the Lila and Acheson Wallace Wing for modern and contemporary art is a comprehensive and unprecedented reinterpretation of the Met’s collections of European and American modern painting, sculpture, photography, and design. These first-floor galleries have been divided into seven themes that relate to art and life in the first half of the 20th century: Avant-Garde (Galleries 908 and 910), Direct Expression (Gallery 911), Abstraction (Galleries 912 and 913), Bodies (Gallery 913), Work and Industry (Gallery 903), The Metropolis (Gallery 902), and Retreat (Galleries 900 and 901).

Sol LeWitt: Wall Drawing #370
June 30, 2014–January 1, 2017

Sol LeWitt’s 1982 wall drawing—The Wall Drawing #370: Ten Geometric Figures (including right triangle, cross, X, diamond) with three-inch parallel bands of lines in two directions—was installed at the Museum over a period of four weeks. The drawing of 10 geometric figures set within squares went on view in its complete state beginning June 30, 2014 and will remain on view until through January 3, 2016, when it will be painted over.
The loan of Wall Drawing #370 is courtesy of The Estate of Sol LeWitt.
The installation is made possible by The Modern Circle.

Fabergé from the Matilda Geddings Gray Foundation Collection
November 22, 2011–November 27, 2016

When Matilda Geddings Gray acquired her first piece of Fabergé for her niece, in 1933, she was already a wealthy and sophisticated collector, and the name of the Russian artist-jeweler Peter Carl Fabergé (1846–1920) was almost unknown in the United States. Since then, Fabergé’s art has become widely known and his exquisite objects are now internationally sought after. On long-term loan to the Museum, this selection from the Matilda Geddings Gray Foundation collection, one of the finest in the world, includes objects created for the Russian Imperial family, such as the Lilies-of-the-Valley Basket—the most important Fabergé creation in the United States—and three Imperial Easter Eggs.

ASIAN ART 100
UPCOMING EXHIBITIONS AND INSTALLATIONS

Encountering Vishnu: The Lion Avatar in Indian Temple Drama
December 19, 2015–June 5, 2016

Dramas presented during religious festivals in southern India are an important aspect of popular Hindu celebration. This exhibition will highlight five rare wooden sculptural masks that represent a largely unrecorded category of late medieval Indian devotional art. The masks depict the characters in the story of the deadly battle between Vishnu in his man-lion avatar, Narasimha, and an evil king whose destruction was essential for the restoration of order in the universe.
#AsianArt100
#VishnuAvatars


ASIAN ART 100
CONTINUING EXHIBITIONS AND INSTALLATIONS

Masterpieces of Chinese Painting from the Metropolitan Collection
October 31, 2015–October 11, 2016

Over the past 40 years, the Metropolitan's collection of Chinese painting and calligraphy has grown to be one of the greatest in the world. With masterpieces dating from the Tang dynasty (608–917) to the present, the collection encompasses the vast historical sweep of the brush arts of China, from serene Buddhist scriptures to bombastic court portraits to lyrical paintings by scholars. Presented in two rotations, this exhibition will highlight the gems of the permanent collection in a chronological display with an emphasis on works from the Song (960–1279) and Yuan (1271 1368) dynasties.
The exhibition is made possible by the Joseph Hotung Fund.
#AsianArt100
#ChinesePainting


Celebrating the Arts of Japan: The Mary Griggs Burke Collection
October 20, 2015–July 31, 2016

Over the course of five decades, Mary Griggs Burke (1916–2012), a New York–based collector of Asian art, built one of the finest and most comprehensive private collections of Japanese art outside Japan. Over 300 masterworks, including outstanding examples of every type of Japanese art represented, were bequeathed to the Metropolitan Museum. This exhibition, which serves as a tribute to a great collector, will reveal the distinctive features of Japanese art as viewed through the lens of 50 years of collecting: the sublime spirituality of Buddhist and Shinto art; the boldness of Zen ink painting; the imaginary world conjured up by the Tale of Genji and classical Japanese literature; the sumptuous colors of bird-and-flower painting; the subtlety of poetry, calligraphy and literati themes; the aestheticized accoutrements of the tea ceremony; and the charming portraiture of courtesans from the "floating world" (ukiyo-e).
#AsianArt100
#ArtsofJapan


Asian Art at 100: A History in Photographs
September 19, 2015–May 22, 2016

A selection of archival photographs of galleries and installations dating from 1907 to 1945 will document the changing face of Asian art at the Metropolitan Museum. Complementing the display will be a wall-mounted timeline with images of the building, floor plans, and small versions of these historic photos to place them in the context of the larger Museum.
#AsianArt100

Chinese Textiles: Ten Centuries of Masterpieces from the Met Collection
August 15, 2015–June 19, 2016

Showcasing some of the most important and unusual textiles in the Museum's collection, this installation will explore the cultural importance of silk in China. Works on view will include three rare pieces dating from the Tang dynasty (618–906), 11th- and 12th-century tapestries from Central Asia, spectacular embroideries, and a monumental panel from the late 17th or early 18th century depicting phoenixes in a garden.
The exhibition is made possible by the Joseph Hotung Fund.
#AsianArt100
#ChineseTextiles


Chinese Lacquer: Treasures from the Irving Collection, 12th-18th Century
August 15, 2015–June 19, 2016

Featuring many of the most important examples of Chinese lacquer in the Museum's collection, this installation will explore the intricate techniques used to embellish lacquer objects with scenes derived from history and literature, images of popular gods, representations of real and mythical animals, landscapes, flowers, and birds.
The exhibition is made possible by the Joseph Hotung Fund.
#AsianArt100
#ChineseLacquer


The Royal Hunt: Courtly Pursuits in Indian Art
June 20–December 8, 2015

Expressions of imperial authority are a universal aspect of royal imagery of the hunt, with rulers pursuing prey as metaphors for power and martial prowess. This theme is celebrated throughout the history of Indian painting, most notably during the reign of the Mughal emperor Akbar, and became ubiquitous in later Rajput painting. This installation will feature works from the Museum’s collections of Asian art, Islamic art, and arms and armor, as well as from New York private collections.
The exhibition is made possible by The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Foundation Fund.
#RoyalHuntIndia

A Passion for Jade: The Heber Bishop Collection
March 14, 2015–June 19, 2016

Heber R. Bishop's collection of carved jades was formed in the last quarter of the 19th century and bequeathed to the Metropolitan Museum in 1902. Consisting of over 1,000 pieces—primarily Chinese jades of the 18th and 19th centuries, and jades from Mughal India—it was the first major collection of its kind in the country. This exhibition features a selection of the finest examples from this renowned collection.
The exhibition is made possible by the Joseph Hotung Fund.
#BishopJades
#AsianArt100


Korea: 100 Years of Collecting at the Met
February 7, 2015–March 27, 2016

In celebration of the Asian Art Department's centennial, the installation traces how the Korean art collection at the Met was formed, and how the Western perception and appreciation of Korea has evolved over the past century as it has transformed from the "Hermit Kingdom" of the late 19th century to the trend-setting contemporary culture of "K-pop."
The exhibition is made possible by Samsung.
#MetKoreanArt
#AsianArt100



The Arts of Nepal and Tibet
March 6, 2015-January 18, 2016

These newly reinstalled galleries for Nepalese and Tibetan arts display some 100 sculptures, paintings, and textiles from the 9th to the 19th century, showcasing the 14 masterpieces acquired recently from the Zimmerman Family Collection.
#NepalTibetArts
#AsianArt100


The Costume Institute’s Anna Wintour Costume Center
Opened May 8, 2014

The Costume Institute galleries reopened on May 8 as the Anna Wintour Costume Center after a two-year renovation, reconfiguration, and updating. The 4,200-square-foot main Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch Gallery features a flexible design that lends itself to frequent transformation, as well as a zonal sound system and innovative projection technology. The redesigned space also includes: the Carl and Iris Barrel Apfel Gallery, which orients visitors to The Costume Institute’s exhibitions and holdings; a state-of-the-art costume conservation laboratory; an expanded study/storage facility that houses the combined holdings of the Met and the Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection (which was transferred to the Met in 2009); and The Irene Lewisohn Costume Reference Library, one of the world’s foremost fashion libraries. The Costume Institute was last refurbished in 1992.

Chinese Treasury
Opened May 19, 2014

This gallery, which recreates the type of collecting and display found in 18th-century treasure cabinets (duobaoge), features some of the Museum's most precious works of Chinese art including sculptures and vessels of ivory, rhinoceros horn, glass, porcelain, and jade. Touchpads allow viewers to read introductory texts for all of the objects as well as to explore further by grouping the works of art digitally by material and by theme.

New European Paintings Galleries, 1250–1800
Opened May 23, 2013

The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s galleries for its world-renowned collection of European Old Master paintings from the 13th through the early 19th century reopened in May 2013 after an extensive renovation and reinstallation. This was the first major renovation of the galleries since 1951 and the first major reinstallation of the collection since 1972. Gallery space has increased by almost one-third, making it possible to display more than 700 paintings from the collection and giving the entire floor of galleries a grandeur not seen in half a century. The reinstallation also captures historical crosscurrents between countries and contacts between artists by placing them in adjoining rooms. The Metropolitan Museum’s collection of early Netherlandish, Italian, and French paintings is wide-ranging and includes landmark pictures, while its collection of Dutch school paintings must be counted among the finest in the world. As for individual artists, the representation of Rembrandt, Rubens, Vermeer, Poussin, Velázquez, Goya, and David is the strongest in the western hemisphere, and there are individual masterpieces known to every student of art history, such as Bruegel’s The Harvesters and David’s The Death of Socrates. Key works have been cleaned, conserved, or reframed, and important new loans complement the collection.

###

November 16, 2015


CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF UPCOMING AND CURRENT
EXHIBITIONS AND INSTALLATIONS:

Jacqueline de Ribes: The Art of Style
November 19, 2015–February 21, 2016

Artistic Furniture of The Gilded Age
In three parts, all opening December 15, 2015
Worsham-Rockefeller Dressing Room (permanent installation): December 15, 2015
George A. Schastey (special exhibition): December 15, 2015–May 1, 2016
Herter Brothers and the William H. Vanderbilt House (gallery installation): December 15, 2015–January 30, 2017

Encountering Vishnu: The Lion Avatar in Indian Temple Drama
December 19, 2015–June 5, 2016

CONTINUING EXHIBITIONS AND INSTALLATIONS:

The Luxury of Time: European Clocks and Watches
November 16, 2015–March 27, 2016

Girolamo dai Libri and Veronese Art of the Sixteenth Century
November 16, 2015–February 7, 2016

American and European Embroidered Samplers, 1600–1900
November 16, 2015–February 15, 2016

Masterpieces of Chinese Painting from the Metropolitan Collection
October 31, 2015–October 11, 2016

Design for Eternity: Architectural Models from the Ancient Americas
October 26, 2015—September 18, 2016

Fashion and Virtue: Textile Patterns and the Print Revolution, 1520–1620
October 20, 2015–January 10, 2016

Celebrating the Arts of Japan: The Mary Griggs Burke Collection
October 20, 2015–July 31, 2016

Andrea del Sarto’s Borgherini Holy Family
October 14, 2015–January 10, 2016

Ancient Egypt Transformed: The Middle Kingdom
October 12, 2015–January 24, 2016

New Discoveries: Early Liturgical Textiles from Egypt, 200–400
September 23, 2015–September 5, 2016

Asian Art at 100: A History in Photographs
September 19, 2015–May 22, 2016

Kongo: Power and Majesty
September 18, 2015–January 3, 2016

In and Out of the Studio: Photographic Portraits from West Africa
August 31, 2015–January 3, 2016

The Aftermath of Conflict: Jo Ractliffe’s Photographs of Angola and South Africa
August 24, 2015–March 6, 2016

Chinese Textiles: Ten Centuries of Masterpieces from the Met Collection
August 15, 2015–June 19, 2016

Chinese Lacquer: Treasures from the Irving Collection, 12th–18th Century
August 15, 2015–June 19, 2016

Grand Illusions: Staged Photography from the Met Collection
August 10, 2015—January 18, 2016

The Royal Hunt: Courtly Pursuits in Indian Art
June 20–December 13, 2015

Arms and Armor: Notable Acquisitions 2003–2014
November 11, 2014–January 3, 2016

Reimagining Modernism: 1900–1950
Opened September 2014

Sol LeWitt: Wall Drawing #370
June 30, 2014–January 1, 2017

Fabergé from the Matilda Geddings Gray Foundation Collection
November 22, 2011–November 27, 2016

Image captions:
Kongo: Power and Majesty: Power Figure (Nkisi N’Kondi: Mangaaka). Kongo peoples; Yombe group, Chiloango River region, Cabinda, Angola, 19th century, inventoried 1898. Wood, iron, resin, ceramic, plant fiber, textile, cowrie shell, animal hide and hair, pigment, H. 461⁄2 in. (118 cm), W. 181⁄8 in. (46 cm), D. 133⁄4 in. (35 cm). Manchester Museum, University of Manchester (0.9321/1)

Ancient Egypt Transformed: The Middle Kingdom: Relief with Senwosret I Running toward Min (detail), Twelfth Dynasty, reign of Senwosret I (ca. 1961-1917 B.C.). Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, London (UC14786)

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