Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History



  • Beakers, ca. 1683 and 1711
    Attributed to Jurian Blanck Jr. (American, baptized 1645–ca. 1714/15); Benjamin Wynkoop (American, ca. 1675–1751)
    New York City
    Silver; Overall 7 3/16 x 4 5/8 in. (18.3 x 11.7 cm); 7 1/4 x 4 1/2 in. (18.4 x 11.4 cm)
    Inscriptions: Een tecken van liefden en waerhyt tot de Kercke aen Kinstoun Ao 1783; Een tecken van liefden en waarhy[with umlaut]dt Tot de Kercke van Kinstoun x x Ano 1711 21 [pellet] November x
    Jointly owned by The Metropolitan Museum of Art and The Reformed Protestant Dutch Church, Kingston, N.Y., 1933 (33.120.621–.622)

    Tall beakers used domestically in the Netherlands prior to the Reformation were later adapted as church silver—a practice followed as well by Dutch Reformed churches in colonial New York. The beaker attributed to Jurian Blanck Jr. is engraved with a Dutch inscription that translates as "Given as a token of devotion and loyalty to the Church in Kingston 1683." The second beaker, made to match by Benjamin Wynkoop around 1711, is similarly inscribed. Each is engraved with representations of Hope, Faith, and Charity.

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    On view: Gallery 750
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  • Beakers, ca. 1683 and 1711
    Attributed to Jurian Blanck Jr. (American, baptized 1645–ca. 1714/15); Benjamin Wynkoop (American, ca. 1675–1751)
    New York City
    Silver; Overall 7 3/16 x 4 5/8 in. (18.3 x 11.7 cm); 7 1/4 x 4 1/2 in. (18.4 x 11.4 cm)
    Inscriptions: Een tecken van liefden en waerhyt tot de Kercke aen Kinstoun Ao 1783; Een tecken van liefden en waarhy[with umlaut]dt Tot de Kercke van Kinstoun x x Ano 1711 21 [pellet] November x
    Jointly owned by The Metropolitan Museum of Art and The Reformed Protestant Dutch Church, Kingston, N.Y., 1933 (33.120.621–.622)


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