Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History



  • Beakers signed by Iason, mid–1st century a.d.; Imperial
    Roman
    Glass; H. 3 9/16 in. (9.1 cm), Diam. 2 9/16 in. (6.6 cm); H. 3 5/8 in. (9.1 cm)
    H. O. Havemeyer Collection, Bequest of Mrs. H. O. Havemeyer, 1929 (29.100.82)
    Fletcher Fund, 1959 (59.11.3)

    This type of barrel-shaped drinking vessel is commonly found on sites in the eastern Mediterranean, but does not seem to have been distributed across the whole of the Roman empire as was the case of Ennion's wares (17.194.226). They are identified as products of a craftsman called Iason by the inscription that runs in the wide band around the middle of each: I A S W N E P O H S E N : M N H S Q H O A G O R A S A S , "Jason Made It : Let the Buyer Remember." Very similar beakers are signed by two other craftsmen, Meges and Neikais. All three are likely to have been contemporaries, but it remains uncertain whether they were colleagues sharing the same workshop or rivals working separately;some scholars believe that the inscription served to advertise that maker as the superior craftsman.

    These two glass beakers were blown into the same mold, or at least two generations of a mold of the same design. Molds were routinely reused, but had a relatively short life span before they broke or the decoration deteriorated, and so duplicates were often made as the need arose. These duplicates could either be held in reserve by the glassmaker himself, or sold or traded. Later-generation molds can be identified by a diminished crispness in design, or decreased size of the vessel.

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  • Beakers signed by Iason, mid-1st century A.D.; Imperial
    Roman
    Glass; H. 3 9/16 in. (9.1 cm), Diam. 2 9/16 in. (6.6 cm); H. 3 5/8 in. (9.1 cm)
    H. O. Havemeyer Collection, Bequest of Mrs. H. O. Havemeyer, 1929 (29.100.82)
    Fletcher Fund, 1959 (59.11.3)

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