Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History



  • Ovidio metamorphoseos vulgare (Ovid's Metamorphoses in the Vernacular): Folio 28
    Author: Ovid
    Translated and paraphrased: Giovanni Bonsignore
    Venice: Lucantonio Giunta, 1501, 2d ed.
    Printed book with woodcut illustrations (from 1497 ed.); 11 11/16 x 8 x 13/16 in. (29.7 x 20.3 x 2 cm)
    Rogers Fund, 1922 (22.16)

    The first illustrated Italian edition of Ovid's Metamorphoses, published in Venice in 1497, translated a Latin paraphrase of the fourteenth century. It was subject to numerous reprintings, often, as in the case of this 1501 edition, with the same late fifteenth-century woodcuts.

    This scene depicts the skilled metalworker Vulcan who, alerted by the all-seeing sun to his wife's infidelity, trapped Venus and Mars in an invisible metal net. Once the lovers were caught, Vulcan called the other Olympians to mock them. Mercury said he would gladly suffer embarrassment to trade places with Mars!

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  • Ovidio metamorphoseos vulgare (Ovid's Metamorphoses in the Vernacular): Folio 28
    Author: Ovid
    Translated and paraphrased: Giovanni Bonsignore
    Venice: Lucantonio Giunta, 1501, 2d ed.
    Printed book with woodcut illustrations (from 1497 ed.); 11 11/16 x 8 x 13/16 in. (29.7 x 20.3 x 2 cm)
    Rogers Fund, 1922 (22.16)

    Ovidio metamorphoseos vulgare (Ovid's Metamorphoses in the Vernacular): Folio 40v
    Author: Ovid
    Translated and paraphrased: Giovanni Bonsignore
    Venice: Lucantonio Giunta, 1501, 2d ed.
    Printed book with woodcut illustrations (from 1497 ed.)

    11 11/16 x 8 x 13/16 in. (29.7 x 20.3 x 2 cm)
    Rogers Fund, 1922 (22.16)

    This woodcut is unlike most of the others in the book in isolating the figures against a dark ground in a manner more characteristic of Florentine woodcuts of the period. However, it is typical of the book's illustration in showing several episodes from a story in the same scene. On the horizon we see Venus (the Greek Aphrodite), who, wishing to extend her dominion to the Underworld, orders a blindfolded Cupid (Eros) to shoot Pluto (Hades) with the arrow that ignites love. At the far left, the maiden Proserpina (Persephone) is depicted gathering flowers with her companions. In the foreground we see Pluto carrying her off, while

    Ovidio metamorphoseos vulgare (Ovid's Metamorphoses in the Vernacular): Folio 49v
    Author: Ovid
    Translated and paraphrased: Giovanni Bonsignore
    Venice: Lucantonio Giunta, 1501, 2d ed.
    Printed book with woodcut illustrations (from 1497 ed.)

    11 11/16 x 8 x 13/16 in. (29.7 x 20.3 x 2 cm)
    Rogers Fund, 1922 (22.16)

    At upper left, the goddess Minerva (the Greek Athena) plays on her newly discovered pipe before an audience of Olympians who laugh at her puffy cheeks. Below, observing her disfigurement in a pool, Minerva casts away the instrument—which has become a bagpipe—in disgust. In the center we see the shepherd Marsyas, who found the pipe, competing in a musical contest with the god Apollo, who holds his lira da braccio in one hand and in the other the sword with which he will flay Marsyas, as shown at right, after vanquishing the shepherd in the competition—we see his skin hanging in a temple in the background. N

    Ovidio metamorphoseos vulgare (Ovid's Metamorphoses in the Vernacular): Folio 89
    Author: Ovid
    Translated and paraphrased: Giovanni Bonsignore
    Venice: Lucantonio Giunta, 1501, 2d ed.
    Printed book with woodcut illustrations (from 1497 ed.)

    11 11/16 x 8 x 13/16 in. (29.7 x 20.3 x 2 cm)
    Rogers Fund, 1922 (22.16)

    Here the story of Adonis is illustrated. When the young Myrra resisted the power of love, she was punished by Venus, who made her fall in love with her own father. With the help of her maid, Myrra tricked her father into sleeping with her, but when the deception was discovered, he chased her from the house with his sword, as depicted at left. At center, Myrra, transformed into a myrrh tree, gives birth to the fruit of that illicit union, the handsome Adonis. To the right of the scene of birth, Venus lies in the lap of the grown Adonis, with whom she has fallen madly in love. Although Venus begged Adonis not to hunt dangerous ani


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