Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History



  • Dish with a handle (tebachi) in the shape of a double fan, Momoyama period (1573–1615), late 16th–early 17th century
    Japanese
    Stoneware with overglaze enamels (Mino ware, Oribe type); H. 5 7/8 in. (14.9 cm)
    The Harry G. C. Packard Collection of Asian Art, Gift of Harry G. C. Packard, and Purchase, Fletcher, Rogers, Harris Brisbane Dick, and Louis V. Bell Funds, Joseph Pulitzer Bequest and The Annenberg Fund Inc. Gift, 1975 (1975.268.443)

    This piece is a fascinating example of Mino ceramics made in accordance with the taste of the tea master Furuta Oribe (1544–1615) and the technical changes brought about by the introduction, in the early seventeenth century, of a more advanced kiln type, the chambered climbing kiln modeled on those built by Korean craftsmen at Karatsu in Kyushu. The earliest and most important new kiln was the one at Motoyashiki, in Mino, where utensils for the tea masters of Kyoto were produced to order. At Motoyashiki, the green-glazed decorated wares known as Oribe ware were produced. This dish in the unusual shape of a double fan was used to serve food. Its decoration combining geometric shapes and abstracted natural motifs is characteristic of Oribe ware.

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  • Dish with a handle (tebachi) in the shape of a double fan, Momoyama period (1573–1615), late 16th–early 17th century
    Japanese
    Stoneware with overglaze enamels (Mino ware, Oribe type); H. 5 7/8 in. (14.9 cm)
    The Harry G. C. Packard Collection of Asian Art, Gift of Harry G. C. Packard, and Purchase, Fletcher, Rogers, Harris Brisbane Dick, and Louis V. Bell Funds, Joseph Pulitzer Bequest and The Annenberg Fund Inc. Gift, 1975 (1975.268.443)

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