Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History



  • The Cabinet–Maker and Upholsterer's Drawing–Book: Frontispiece and title page (vol. 1), plates 33 and 35 (vol. 2), 1793
    Thomas Sheraton (British, 1751–1806)
    London
    Rogers Fund (161 Sh5)

    Design for an armchair illustrated on plate 33 of Thomas Sheraton's Cabinet-Maker and Upholsterer's Drawing-Book. Sheraton published this influential pattern book in forty-two biweekly installments between 1791 and 1793. The first complete edition of the Drawing-Book was issued in two volumes in 1793 and included sixty-nine designs for furniture. Sheraton added an "Accompaniement" with fourteen plates to the second edition in 1794 and published a revised edition in 1802. The only documented evidence of the Drawing-Book in America is a copy of the first edition bearing the signature of Thomas Seymour (1771–1848), son of John Seymour, an English cabinetmaker who emigrated to Portland, Maine, in 1785, and nine years later established himself in the trade in Boston with his son as partner. A number of designs in the Drawing-Book are repeated on American furniture of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century, including designs in Salem, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, and other ports in the South.

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  • The Cabinet-Maker and Upholsterer's Drawing-Book: Frontispiece and title page (vol. 1), plates 33 and 35 (vol. 2), 1793
    Thomas Sheraton (British, 1751–1806)
    London
    Rogers Fund (161 Sh5)
    Design for a Secretary and Bookcase: Plate 28 of The Cabinet-Maker and Upholsterer's Drawing-Book, 1793
    Thomas Sheraton (British, 1751–1806)
    London
    Rogers Fund (161 Sh5)

    The carving on the cornice of this desk and bookcase is related to the ornamentation found on furniture linked to the shop of Duncan Phyfe. A surviving square-back sofa dated July 1804 features a nearly identical carved crest rail and includes the written inscription "For Duncan Phyfe, L. Ackerman, his stuffing." Lawrence Ackerman, a prominent upholsterer in early nineteenth-century New York, was retained by Phyfe to cover the sofa frame that was manufactured in his shop.


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