• Traveling Exhibitions Traveling Exhibitions
  • Traveling Works of Art Traveling Works of Art
  • Conservation Conservation Projects
  • Excavations Excavations
  • Fellows Fellows
  • Exchanges & Collaborations Exchanges & Collaborations
  • Multiple Categories Multiple Items
    About The Met Around the World

The Met Around the World presents the Met’s work via the global scope of its collections and as it extends across the nation and the world through a variety of domestic and international initiatives and programs, including exhibitions, excavations, fellowships, professional exchanges, conservation projects, and traveling works of art.

Traveling
Exhibitions

The Met organizes large and small exhibitions that travel beyond the Museum's walls, extending our scholarship to institutions across the world. See our international exhibition program from 2009 to the present.

Traveling
Works of Art

The Met lends works of art to exhibitions and institutions worldwide to expose its collection to the broadest possible audience. See our current international loans program.

Conservation
Projects

The preservation of works of art is a fundamental part of the Met's mission. Our work in this area includes treating works of art from other international collections, and advising on conservation projects and practices globally. See our international conservation program from 2009 to the present.

Excavations

The Met has conducted excavations for over 100 years in direct partnership with source countries at some of the most important archaeological sites in the world. Today we continue this tradition in order to gain greater understanding of our ancient collections. See our international excavation program from the Met's founding to the present.

Fellows

The Met hosts international students, scholars, and museum professionals so that they can learn from our staff and pursue independent research in the context of the Met's exceptional resources and facilities. See the activities of our current national and international fellows.

Exchanges & Collaborations

The Met's international work takes many forms, from participation in exchange programs at partnering institutions and worldwide symposia to advising on a range of museum issues. These activities contribute to our commitment to advancing the work of the larger, global community of art museums. See our international exchange program and other collaborations from 2009 to the present.

There are currently no international activities in this region.
Excavations throughout Met History, 1870–present
1 /
  • Excavations at the palace of Amenhotep III, Malqata, 1910–11 season (PA24). Debris in the foreground consists of mounds of broken pottery.
  • Blue-Painted Ibex Amphora from Malqata

    New Kingdom, Dynasty 18, reign of Amenhotep III, ca. 1390–1353 B.C.

    Egypt, Upper Egypt; Thebes, Malqata, Palace of Amenhotep III, Atitu's (rubbish) hole, MMA 1910–1911

    Rogers Fund, 1911 (11.215.460)

  • Ring Inscribed with the Prenomen of Amenhotep III

    New Kingdom, Dynasty 18, reign of Amenhotep III, ca. 1390–1352 B.C.

    Egypt, Upper Egypt; Thebes, Malqata, Palace of Amenhotep III, MMA 1910–1911

    Rogers Fund, 1911 (11.215.73)

  • Inscribed Ring, Royal Wife Tiy

    New Kingdom, Dynasty 18, reign of Amenhotep III, ca. 1390–1353 B.C.

    Egypt, Upper Egypt; Thebes, Malqata, Palace of Amenhotep III, House 2.w, MMA 1911–1912

    Rogers Fund, 1911 (11.215.83)

  • Stamp Seal in the Shape of a Frog

    New Kingdom, Dynasty 18, reign of Amenhotep III, ca. 1390–1352 B.C.

    Egypt, Upper Egypt; Thebes, Malqata, Palace of Amenhotep III, MMA 1910–1911

    Rogers Fund, 1911 (11.215.48)

  • Leaf Pendant

    New Kingdom, Dynasty 18, reign of Amenhotep III, ca. 1390–1353 B.C.

    Egypt, Upper Egypt; Thebes, Malqata, Palace of Amenhotep III, MMA 1910–1911

    Rogers Fund, 1911 (11.215.339)

  • Fragment of a Glass Vase

    New Kingdom, Dynasty 18, reign of Amenhotep III, ca. 1390–1353 B.C.

    Egypt, Upper Egypt; Thebes, Malqata, Palace of Amenhotep III, MMA 1910–1912

    Rogers Fund, 1912 (12.180.360)

Malqata, Thebes

[active] Egypt

1910–1920, 2008–present

Background

Malqata is the modern name for the site of a mudbrick palace-city built by the Dynasty 18 pharaoh Amenhotep III (ca. 1390–1353 B.C.) for the celebration of his first Heb-Sed, a rejuvenation festival that traditionally occurred in the thirtieth year of a king's reign and periodically thereafter. Amenhotep had three Heb-Seds and for each festival the structures were refurbished and the site expanded.

In keeping with its purpose, the ancient name for the site was "the House of Rejoicing." It's modern name, Malqata, means a place where things are found, or picked up. This undoubtedly refers to the bits of painted pottery, glass, and faience that once littered the site—debris from Amenhotep's jubilees, each of which lasted for a number of months and included hundreds, if not thousands, of participants.

Amenhotep's "House of Rejoicing" and the surrounding villages were used only for his three festivals and were largely abandoned after the king's death. The site was never built on again and the mudbrick structures gradually fell into ruin and were eventually covered with wind-blown debris from the yearly sandstorms that blow off the high desert (the Sahara) to the west.

Excavations

Malqata preserves the ruins of one of the few extensive town sites that survive from ancient Egyptian times. In 1910, the Egyptian Antiquities Service granted the Metropolitan Museum's Egyptian Expedition a concession to work at the site, which had been partially explored by two previous expeditions. Metropolitan Museum Egyptologist Herbert E. Winlock, Hugh G. Evelyn-White, and finally Ambrose Lansing supervised the excavations. Work continued for six field seasons, ending in 1920. The areas explored included the royal palaces and ceremonial buildings, villas of court officials, a temple dedicated to the god Amun, and villages inhabited by the hundreds of servants, tradesmen, and craftsmen needed to provide services and goods for the royal court.

The Expedition's team of archaeologists and draftsmen produced plans of the structures, photographed the progress of the excavations, and published summaries of each season's work in the Museum's Bulletins. The archaeological finds included fragmentary paintings that had decorated the walls, ceilings, and floors of the palaces; distinctive blue-painted pottery; inscribed potshards and jar sealings; and raw materials for making glass vessels and faience jewelry that suggest nearby manufacture of these products. The Museum's share of these finds may be seen in Egyptian galleries 119 and 120.

In 2008, the Department of Egyptian Art began a reexamination of the site.

Partnered with The Michael C. Carlos Museum of Emory University.
 
© 2012–2014 The Metropolitan Museum of Art