Quantcast

The Metropolitan Museum of Art LogoEmail

Type the CAPTCHA word:

Teen Blog

Impressions of Ink Art

Jill, TAG Member

Posted: Friday, February 21, 2014

The exhibition Ink Art: Past as Present in Contemporary China is all about ink. Darks and lights and midtones are used everywhere. There are so many different art styles that you're bound to find something you like. The exhibition features several scrolls, which tell stories through writing or pictures and even through combinations of the two.

Read More

Teen Blog

A Glimpse of China: Duan Jianyu's Beautiful Dream 3

Karl, TAG Member

Posted: Thursday, February 13, 2014

Duan Jianyu's Beautiful Dream series in the exhibition Ink Art: Past as Present in Contemporary China is surprisingly beautiful given the fact that it was painted on old corrugated cardboard boxes.

Read More

Teen Blog

Book from the Sky: A Story with No Words

Natalee, TAG Member; Brooke, TAG Member; and Tiffany, TAG Member

Posted: Friday, February 7, 2014

Before we encountered Xu Bing's Book from the Sky, we passed by Ai Weiwei's Han Jar Overpainted with Coca-Cola Logo—and almost missed it. The pot, located in the ancient Chinese galleries, looks ordinary except for its iconic logo. This was where we started to learn that the contemporary Chinese art scene is born from the synthesis and refutation of tradition.

Read More

Teen Blog

Tradition and Identity in Ink Art

Angeles, TAG Member; and Jacqui, Teen Program Participant

Posted: Friday, January 31, 2014

In Ink Art: Past as Present in Contemporary China, we came across many pieces of artwork that exemplify the contrast between contemporary and traditional art. One of these pieces was Family Tree, a series of nine photographs in which the artist Zhang Huan's face gradually becomes covered in ink and traditional calligraphy.

Read More

Teen Blog

Ink Art's Merging of the Old and the New

Emily Z., TAG Member; Sage, TAG Member; and Genevieve, TAG Member

Posted: Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Upon first seeing Han Jar Overpainted with Coca-Cola Logo in the special exhibition Ink Art: Past as Present in Contemporary China, we were overwhelmingly reminded of one of the larger themes of modern Chinese art: the conflict between the progression of the modern and the preservation of the traditional. This Han dynasty pot emblazoned with the faded Coca-Cola logo struck us as an almost humorous representation of this conflict.

Read More

Teen Blog

Contrast and Balance in Jewels by JAR

Chantal Stein, College Intern

Posted: Tuesday, January 14, 2014

It takes a minute for your eyes to adjust to the darkness in the exhibition Jewels by JAR (on view through March 9, 2014). The walls are black, the ceilings are high, and glass cases lined with red velvet are set into walls and columns. Warm lights behind the glass spotlight the artwork within.

Read More

Teen Blog

How Did He Paint That?

Lawrence, Former High School Intern

Posted: Tuesday, December 31, 2013

There are a handful of paintings at the Met that made a huge impression on me when I first saw them. Two of them are Sanford Robinson Gifford's A Gorge in the Mountains (Kauterskill Clove) and Frederic Edwin Church's The Aegean Sea. Every time I see these paintings, I ask myself, "How did he paint that?!"

Read More

Teen Blog

My Favorite Room at the Met

Lucie, Former High School Intern

Posted: Monday, December 23, 2013

My favorite room at the Met is gallery 735 because it houses John Vanderlyn's Panoramic View of the Palace and Gardens of Versailles. I first visited the gallery on the recommendation of a friend, and since then I've been back many times.

Read More

Teen Blog

Diary of a Ceiling Fan

Helen, Former High School Intern

Posted: Monday, December 16, 2013

I constantly find myself looking up at the ceilings whenever I visit The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Turning my gaze upward allows me to clear my thoughts and forget about any commotion around me.

Read More

Teen Blog

An International Take on Textiles

Brooke, TAG Member; and Tiffany, TAG Member

Posted: Monday, November 18, 2013

Though we tend to associate globalization with the modern, Western-dominated world of capital goods, in reality it began long ago with textiles. The current exhibition Interwoven Globe: The Worldwide Textile Trade, 1500–1800 is the first major exhibition to explore this international exchange of design ideas through the medium of textiles.

Read More

Follow This Blog: Subscribe

About this Blog

This blog, written by the Metropolitan Museum's Teen Advisory Group (TAG) and occasional guest authors, is a place for teens to talk about art at the Museum and related topics.