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Modern and Contemporary Art

Modern

The Metropolitan Museum has collected and exhibited work by living artists since its founding in 1870. Today, the department's holdings comprise more than twelve thousand works of art across a broad range of media from 1900 to the present.

Teen Blog

Interviewing Sculptures at the Met

Floraine, Former High School Intern

Posted: Friday, July 25, 2014

As I travel through the galleries of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, one question always lingers in my mind: If these inanimate objects were able to speak, what would they say? I have taken on the task of "interviewing" three sculptures to break their silence and give us more insight into their lives and stories.

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Teen Blog

Lilith

Morgan, High School Intern

Posted: Friday, May 23, 2014

I was introduced to Lilith by Kiki Smith on a tour of modern sculpture at the Met. What first struck me about this piece was its location: it's literally hanging upside down in the middle of the wall as you walk up the stairs in the Modern and Contemporary Art galleries from the first floor to the second.

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Teen Blog

Ink Art's Merging of the Old and the New

Emily Z., TAG Member; Sage, TAG Member; and Genevieve, TAG Member

Posted: Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Upon first seeing Han Jar Overpainted with Coca-Cola Logo in the special exhibition Ink Art: Past as Present in Contemporary China, we were overwhelmingly reminded of one of the larger themes of modern Chinese art: the conflict between the progression of the modern and the preservation of the traditional. This Han dynasty pot emblazoned with the faded Coca-Cola logo struck us as an almost humorous representation of this conflict.

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Teen Blog

Contrast and Balance in Jewels by JAR

Chantal Stein, College Intern

Posted: Tuesday, January 14, 2014

It takes a minute for your eyes to adjust to the darkness in the exhibition Jewels by JAR (on view through March 9, 2014). The walls are black, the ceilings are high, and glass cases lined with red velvet are set into walls and columns. Warm lights behind the glass spotlight the artwork within.

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Teen Blog

Lollipop Trees on Concrete Tiles

Kristen, TAG Member

Posted: Thursday, August 15, 2013

What happened here? Did someone spill paint on these tiles? Is this supposed to be blood? Is there blood all over the roof of the Metropolitan Museum of Art?!

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Teen Blog

The Unexpected Humanity of the Roof Garden Commission

Maleficent Twemlow (a.k.a. Anna), TAG Member

Posted: Thursday, August 8, 2013

Upon first seeing Imran Qureshi's installation on the Museum's roof garden, I was immediately struck by how effectively it subverts one's expectations. Along with the rest of the Teen Advisory Group, I was simply informed that we would be visiting a "rooftop installation," which immediately brought to mind the kind of monolithic modernist sculpture that seems to be increasingly ubiquitous in outdoor art installations these days. Surprisingly, though, we were greeted with something much more subtle and thought-provoking.

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Teen Blog

The Poppy Field on the Rooftop

Tiffany, TAG Member

Posted: Thursday, August 1, 2013

Sudden violence in the United States, especially when unpredictable, triggers an immediate and mass reaction. This is hardly so in the case of Pakistan, however, a country where violence is the norm and not the exception. At the Museum's roof garden this summer, contemporary Pakistani artist Imran Qureshi challenges American viewers to immerse themselves in the bloodbath of civilians killed in sectarian conflicts far away from our own shores.

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Teen Blog

The Dividing Line

Karl, TAG Member

Posted: Friday, July 26, 2013

Imran Qureshi's installation on the Met's roof is abrupt. Looking across the roof, one is confronted by something of a geological layering. In the foreground, violence and bloodshed come to mind, and behind, the Met's stone superstructure separates you from the immediacy of Central Park's seemingly dense forests. Looking down at your feet, your confidence is partially shattered by the realization that you are walking on paint. Instinctively, my feet searched for an oasis of untainted stone.

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Teen Blog

Crossing Borders

Shivanna, TAG Member

Posted: Friday, July 19, 2013

The Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden at the Metropolitan Museum is a magnificent place to exhibit art high above Central Park. You have the warm sun, the sounds of nature, the clear blue sky, the green foliage, and a breathtaking view of the concrete jungle around you. Walking out onto the roof recently, I expected to see an immense sculpture. Instead, I was greeted by Pakistani artist Imran Qureshi's painted installation.

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Teen Blog

Licked: The Academic Ideal

Kristen, TAG Member

Posted: Monday, June 3, 2013

Impressionist paintings are so beautiful, emotional, and colorful, yet in the nineteenth century, they were considered laughable; at the time, people favored meticulously realistic, "licked" paintings over the Impressionists' "broken brushstrokes." The term "licked" refers to paintings that shine like someone has licked them to even out any trace of brushstrokes, and "broken brushstrokes" refers to thick dabs of paint on a canvas.

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About this Blog

This blog, written by the Metropolitan Museum's Teen Advisory Group (TAG) and occasional guest authors, is a place for teens to talk about art at the Museum and related topics.