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European Paintings

European Paintings

The Metropolitan Museum's world-famed collection of European paintings encompasses works of art from the thirteenth through the nineteenth centuries—from Giotto to Gauguin. Most, though not all, are displayed in the galleries of the Department of European Paintings. Others works of art can be found in the Lehman Collection, the Linsky Collection, The Cloisters, and in various period rooms.

Teen Blog

The Great Debate

Ariana, Former High School Intern

Posted: Tuesday, November 10, 2015

Jules Bastien-Lepage's Joan of Arc has always intrigued me because Joan of Arc has always interested me as a historical figure, particularly because of the lack of women represented in history. Disguised as a man, Joan made her way to the besieged city of Orléans and helped to free it. After playing a role in various other military campaigns, she was captured and then burned at the stake.

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Teen Blog

Splinters of Light

Jo, Guest Blogger

Posted: Wednesday, October 7, 2015

I wrote the poems featured in this post while visiting the Met over the course of the past six months. The key to writing about these artworks was having a connection to them over time. Sitting in a gallery for about fifteen minutes each visit, I first looked at all the artworks in the space, and then zeroed in on one that drew my attention. I then jotted down notes, and made quick sketches with a pink sharpie in my moleskin journal. During subsequent visits, I wrote rough drafts, and then edited them into polished pieces.

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Teen Blog

Lessons from Van Gogh

Mely, Former High School Intern

Posted: Wednesday, September 30, 2015

Vincent van Gogh is known to have struggled with his mental health. He spent time at an asylum in Saint-Rémy in the south of France, and during his time there, he worked to understand how certain colors could be expressed in relation to each other by painting flowers. Just before he left the asylum, he painted a series of irises and roses—two paintings of each in different formats and colors—which were featured in the recently closed exhibition Van Gogh: Irises and Roses.

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Teen Blog

Becoming Art through Photography

Gwen W., Former High School Intern

Posted: Tuesday, September 8, 2015

Experiencing art in a gallery is like coming out of a subway station in a new neighborhood and trying to navigate the vast unfamiliarity of the cityscape ahead of you. Crisscrossing lines, variegated colors, and the overlapping patterns of light, architecture, and people draw your eye in every direction, creating an overwhelming visual experience. Though neighborhoods each have their own culture and atmosphere, their boundaries melt into each other, asking you to reorient yourself as you meander through them.

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Teen Blog

Enchanted by Antiques

Anika, Guest Blogger

Posted: Friday, May 15, 2015

In celebration of the 2015 Scholastic Art & Writing Awards exhibition, now on view in the Ruth and Harold D. Uris Center for Education, the Teen Blog will feature guest posts by Scholastic Gold Key Award writers from New York City through the close of the exhibition on May 17. This week's blogger, Anika, was awarded a Gold Key for her poem, "Tale of a River Stone."

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Teen Blog

Behind the Portraits of Madame Cézanne

Desiree, High School Intern

Posted: Friday, March 6, 2015

My first impression of Hortense Fiquet, or Madame Cézanne, is that she has the face of the disapproving old woman who lives next door to you. Her expression is similar to that of someone unaware they're having their picture taken. Regardless of her harsh looks, post-Impressionist painter Paul Cézanne decided to depict his wife, time and time again, over a twenty-year period, presenting Fiquet in a serene light that gives her an air of mystery and intrigue.

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Teen Blog

Van Gogh's Cypresses

Luca, Former High School Intern

Posted: Friday, August 1, 2014

Vincent van Gogh painted a series of cypress trees during his stay in an asylum in Saint-Remy, France, but one work in particular—Cypresses—has always stood out to me.

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Teen Blog

How Well Do You Know the Met?

Emma, Former High School Intern

Posted: Friday, June 13, 2014

The Metropolitan Museum of Art is home to some of the world's most respected art. People from all over the world come to see the collection and appreciate the history and stories that the works present. Think you know the Met's collection like a pro? Here's a game to test your knowledge and see just how much you know about the artists and their subjects.

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Teen Blog

Possibly Love

Angeles, TAG Member; and Genevieve, TAG Member

Posted: Friday, May 2, 2014

The Wedding of Stephen Beckingham and Mary Cox by William Hogarth is a very intriguing piece. It depicts an intimate affair in which only family members and people on a "need-to-know" basis are present.

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Teen Blog

Major in Fearlessness

Sumura, TAG Member; and Tiffany, TAG Member

Posted: Friday, April 25, 2014

In European Paintings gallery 643, we were struck by two paintings by Lucas Cranach the Elder that portray fearless heroines furthering the Christian cause. At first, we thought (wrongly) that the two works depict the same girl due to the figures' rich, red-orange dresses and pale faces with curly hair. We also noted the parallel between the guy beheading the girl in one work and the girl beheading the guy in the other. When we learned that the girls are actually different people—Barbara and Judith—we synthesized the two brave heroines into one and created a short story about her.

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About this Blog

This blog, written by the Metropolitan Museum's Teen Advisory Group (TAG) and occasional guest authors, is a place for teens to talk about art at the Museum and related topics.