Quantcast

Stories in Designing Nature: The Rinpa Aesthetic in Japanese Art

Finding Enlightenment in the Japanese Wing

Cheeky Swagger (a.k.a. Dan), TAG Member; and Maleficent Twemlow (a.k.a. Anna), TAG Member

Posted: Tuesday, November 27, 2012

Spring Trees and Grasses by a Stream

According to Joseph Loh, a Museum educator specializing in Japanese art, the ideal time to see cherry blossoms is not when they are most bountiful, nor when the flowers have peaked at full bloom, but rather as the flowers begin to fall and inevitably die. It is the melancholy nature, he says, that makes this event so spectacular because it can only be witnessed once each year.

Read More

Nothing Lasts Forever

Mayra, TAG Member; and Tiffany, TAG Member

Posted: Tuesday, November 20, 2012

Autumn Ivy

In western society, people don't really notice the transition between seasons until it has already taken place. Artworks painted in the Japanese Rinpa style, by contrast, highlight a cultural focus on the seasons through natural imagery, vibrant colors, and connections to literature. This fall, in the exhibition Designing Nature: The Rinpa Aesthetic in Japanese Art, Ogata Kenzan's Autumn Ivy shows us how much one can appreciate nature through observation and reflection.

Read More

Personal Responses to Designing Nature: The Rinpa Aesthetic in Japanese Art

Cheeky Swagger (a.k.a. Dan), TAG Member; and Kristen, TAG Member

Posted: Tuesday, November 13, 2012

Ogata Kenzan (Japanese, 1663–1743) | “Sixth Month” after Fujiwara no Teika’s “Poems of Birds and Flowers of the Twelve Months,” from Gleanings of Worthless Weeds (Shuiguso) | 1975.268.66

This week, we have chosen to present our personal responses to the exhibition Designing Nature: The Rinpa Aesthetic in Japanese Art. Dan has written a poem inspired by several examples of poetry in the exhibition, and Kristen has created a collage inspired by images of cherry blossoms.

Read More

Literature, Love, and Art

Audrey, Former TAG Member and High School Intern

Posted: Monday, November 5, 2012

Poem by Kiyowara no Fukayabu with Design of Wisteria

Visitors come to the Metropolitan Museum expecting to be immersed in beautiful art from various eras. Whether they're looking for a particular piece or intending to stroll casually through the galleries, they might be surprised to get wrapped up in a story.

Read More

About this Blog

This blog, written by the Metropolitan Museum's Teen Advisory Group (TAG) and occasional guest authors, is a place for teens to talk about art at the Museum and related topics.

Categories