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Teen Blog

Teens Took the Met!

Brittany Prieto, Assistant Museum Educator for Teen Programs, Education Department

Posted: Friday, October 24, 2014

Last Friday, October 17, the Met and more than forty community partners welcomed 2,843 teens into the Museum for the inaugural Teens Take the Met event. After getting wristbands, a Teen Pass, and information about the activities on offer, teens had a number of options from which to choose. There was art making in the Uris Center for Education and the galleries, games in the Loud Library (the Nolen Library), performances, pop-up concerts and film screenings, and 3D printing experiments—all done to the tunes of DJ Kakez, who supplied the soundtrack for the night.

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Teen Blog

Teens Take the Met

Karina Krainchich, College Intern; and Chantal Stein, College Intern

Posted: Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Teens Take the Met
Friday, October 17, 5:00–8:00 p.m.
Ruth and Harold D. Uris Center for Education (Show location on map)

This Friday, October 17, teens are going to take over the Met! Teens ages 13 and older are invited to a Museum-wide, teen-only festival in which they can engage with the Museum's collection, explore their own creativity, and make the Met their space to explore and experiment with art.

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Teen Blog

A Re-creation of Robert Lehman's Sitting Room

Hannah, Former High School Intern

Posted: Friday, October 10, 2014

Between the huge, eighteenth-century choir screen in gallery 305 and the Museum's cafeteria is a really special place: The Robert Lehman Collection, a series of small, beautiful galleries home to one of the most diverse and beautiful collections of art I've ever seen.

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Teen Blog

One in Over Two Million

Kendra, Former Graduate Intern, Education Department

Posted: Friday, October 3, 2014

From the more than two million works in the Met's permanent collection, one tiny object has held me captive ever since I first laid eyes on it. I started my graduate internship in the Education Department in late January of this year, and as I made my way through the Museum throughout my internship—selecting artworks for programs and supporting events, ambling from the mailroom to the Petrie Court, and exploring the galleries of African, Asian, and medieval art—the Crib of the Infant Jesus always managed to stop me in my tracks, demanding at least a few good minutes of contemplation each time.

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Teen Blog

Deliniation by Way of Deconstruction

Hannah, Former High School Intern

Posted: Friday, September 26, 2014

I think I'd have really liked to have had my portrait painted by Pablo Picasso, but for reasons beyond the obvious desire to be painted by one of the most renowned artists to have ever existed. What is so tantalizing about Picasso's portraits is the expression of human psychology through his representation of the human form.

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Teen Blog

Photography through the Lens of Garry Winogrand

Danielle, Teen Program Participant

Posted: Friday, September 19, 2014

Growing up in the midst of the digital age, where technology is constantly advancing, my conception of the past is ever-changing. For example, my initial interest in digital photography led me to look further into film photography, but after discovering the visually stunning work of Garry Winogrand currently on view at the Met, my views on film photography have already been altered.

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Teen Blog

The Old, the Bold, and the Colorful

Pamela, Teen Program Participant

Posted: Wednesday, September 17, 2014

What do a tropical bird, fruit, and a new box of crayons all have in common? Well, they're bright and full of color, of course—something that can't be found within the array of photographs in the Met's current exhibition Garry Winogrand, on view through September 21. Growing up, I was always told, "Not everything is black and white…" But who says it can't be?

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Teen Blog

Digital Stories

Diana, Teen Program Participant

Posted: Friday, September 12, 2014

Digital (dig·it·al)
/dijitil/
adjective

1.   (of signals or data) expressed as series of the digits 0 and 1, typically represented by values of a physical quantity such as voltage or magnetic polarization.

1.1.   relating to, using, or storing data or information in the form of digital signals. "digital TV"
1.2.   involving or relating to the use of computer technology. "the digital revolution"

Story (sto·ry)
/stôrē/
noun; plural noun: stories

1.   an account of imaginary or real people and events told for entertainment. "an adventure story"

And that's just what a photograph is, a digital story, right?

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Teen Blog

Seeing With Winogrand

Marina, Teen Program Participant

Posted: Friday, September 5, 2014

There is no doubt that photography deserves to be considered an art form. Just like painting, sculpture, and countless other media, it dares you as a photographer to see things in ways no one has before. It allows you to be unique and capture life around you. Artists were doing this for centuries before the first camera was even invented. However, with the advent of photography, for the first time moments could be captured in a flash. A subject did not need to hold still for a painter or pose endlessly for a sculptor. Photography broke down the facade and revealed moments of life more accurately than ever before. Garry Winogrand was able to show this through thousands of his candid street shots. Most people did not realize that they were being photographed, showing real expressions instead of posing with a phony smile.

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Teen Blog

Garry Winogrand: An Unassuming Genius

Alexa, Teen Program Participant

Posted: Tuesday, September 2, 2014

In a taped 1977 interview at Rice University, Garry Winogrand sits before a panel of students in the most casual position: his feet are propped up onto the podium before him and he leans back, relaxed, with his hands behind his head—the ultimate posture of a carefree New Yorker. Winogrand's conversational and, at times, sarcastic tone reveals how he does not take himself too seriously. In his answers, he makes his photographic process seem quite simple: a matter of waiting for spontaneity and a having a quick eye to capture it. Despite his quick pace when photographing, Winogrand was able to give his chance encounters great meaning, effectively using light and interesting angles to powerfully capture the fast-moving American culture.

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About this Blog

This blog, written by the Metropolitan Museum's Teen Advisory Group (TAG) and occasional guest authors, is a place for teens to talk about art at the Museum and related topics.