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Teen Blog

Garry Winogrand's Perfect Mistakes

Danlly, Teen Program Participant

Posted: Friday, August 22, 2014

I consider Garry Winogrand's photographs found in the current exhibition of his work to be a collection of perfect mistakes. "Perfect" because, even though the subject is often not posing or even looking straight at the camera, there is something about the picture that makes it incredibly engaging. The very same picture can simultaneously feel like a "mistake," however, since it may capture people who are either unaware they are being photographed or are unhappy about it. In some cases, it feels to me like Winogrand accidentally pressed the shutter button. Normally people have to pose or look at the camera in order for a photograph to be considered successful, but Winogrand instead intended to capture these unguarded people and moments.

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Teen Blog

Front to Back, Real to Posed: Is Winogrand-Style Street Photography Dead?

Oren, Teen Program Participant

Posted: Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Garry Winogrand's street photography, currently on view in an eponymous exhibition at the Museum, is often astonishingly candid and real. But would he have been able to use his distinct style today? The Internet has made it easier than ever to share photos and spread them around. But it's also made people far more self-conscious when being photographed and, dare I say, more frightened of the camera.

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Teen Blog

Garry Winogrand: A Perspective on the Past

Joleyne, Teen Program Participant

Posted: Friday, August 15, 2014

Today, with the special features on DSLRs, you can get a good shot even in difficult lighting environments. You can also use Photoshop and special effects to alter photographs after they've been taken. But imagine a time in which photo editing was not as common and photography was not as easy to do as it is today.

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Teen Blog

Take the Pic or It Didn't Happen

Ann, Teen Program Participant

Posted: Friday, August 8, 2014

In the words of Garry Winogrand, subject of the current exhibition bearing his name, "If you didn't take the picture, you weren't there." Today, when most people hear a bizarre story, they want to have some sort of evidence, like a photograph. They want to see whatever happened with their own eyes. Winogrand upends this scenario. Instead, he simply provides the proof, and denies the audience the story behind it.

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Teen Blog

A First Look at Garry Winogrand

Joseph, Teen Program Participant

Posted: Tuesday, August 5, 2014

It's a human tendency to take apart what's put in front of us. But more importantly, we have a selfish desire to connect a piece of artwork to our lives in some way. We may feel almost dead if we are unable to connect the artwork to some greater philosophical idea that we believe to be present. While there is nothing wrong with that process, the artist may not agree with your interpretation, as the work may in fact have no underlying meaning. The artist may have simply created the piece because of its aesthetics.

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Teen Blog

Van Gogh's Cypresses

Luca, Former High School Intern

Posted: Friday, August 1, 2014

Vincent van Gogh painted a series of cypress trees during his stay in an asylum in Saint-Remy, France, but one work in particular—Cypresses—has always stood out to me.

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Teen Blog

Interviewing Sculptures at the Met

Floraine, Former High School Intern

Posted: Friday, July 25, 2014

As I travel through the galleries of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, one question always lingers in my mind: If these inanimate objects were able to speak, what would they say? I have taken on the task of "interviewing" three sculptures to break their silence and give us more insight into their lives and stories.

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Teen Blog

Charles James, Artist and Innovator

Angeles, TAG Member; Jill, TAG Member; and Maleficent Twemlow (a.k.a. Anna), TAG Member

Posted: Monday, July 21, 2014

Charles James grew up traveling with his family to fashion capitals all over the globe. He gained inspiration from the world around him and then put his own personal spin on traditional ideas, never choosing to follow any particular seasonal trends. He loved to take funky fabric and work it into ways never seen before. For example, if a fabric was meant to be used in a stiff manner, James would soften it with steam and bend it to his desired shape. He was uncompromising in his vision, always favoring his personal ideals of feminine beauty over the specific desires of his clients, who, despite this stubbornness, loved him. He was a revolutionary iconoclast who considered himself as much an artist and a technician as a designer.

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Teen Blog

Charles James: Designing for the Female Form

Morgan, High School Intern

Posted: Friday, July 11, 2014

Charles James: Beyond Fashion features the works of revolutionary fashion designer Charles James, known for his avant-garde concepts and architecturally advanced structure and form. Upon coming into the gallery filled with ball gowns, you're greeted by these amazing dresses on circular pedestals. The whole room is so dimly lit that the dresses almost seem to be suspended in mid-air in the semidarkness.

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Teen Blog

Charles James: The Fashion Engineer

Brooke, TAG Member; Natalee, TAG Member; and Tiffany, TAG Member

Posted: Friday, July 4, 2014

As your eyes adjust to the dim light in the exhibition Charles James: Beyond Fashion, text appears on the glass before you and guides how you should consider the dresses behind it—if you can even call them dresses! Charles James revolutionized the twentieth-century fashion establishment through his idiosyncratic transformation of stiff millinery material into soft, fluid lines that mirror his notion of a woman's ideal form. The lines of his dresses emulate the modern art of Georgia O'Keeffe.

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About this Blog

This blog, written by the Metropolitan Museum's Teen Advisory Group (TAG) and occasional guest authors, is a place for teens to talk about art at the Museum and related topics.