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Gold box ring surmounted by a scarab

Period:
Classical
Date:
ca.330–310 B.C.
Culture:
Greek
Medium:
gold
Dimensions:
H.: 1 1/4 in. (3.2 cm)
Classification:
Miscellaneous-Amber
Credit Line:
Purchase, Schultz Foundation Gift, 2010
Accession Number:
2010.226
  • Description

    From the end of the third millennium B.C., the scarab beetle served as an amulet in Egypt, where
    it represented the sun god. In the Greek world, beginning in the sixth century B.C., it became
    the predominant type of gem, cut in carnelian and other hard stones. By the fourth century B.C.,
    the scarab was integrated into gold rings. Here, kneeling Eros on the underside of the bezel may
    signify that the ring was a love gift and his discrete location suggests the love message was
    meant primarily for the wearer.

  • Provenance

    By 1968, collection of Heinz Hoek, Riehen, Switzerland; inherited by one of his grandchildren, William Hoek, Brussels; purchased from W. Hoek by Robert Haber; [until 2010, with Robert Haber and Associates, New York]; acquired in 2010, purchased from Robert Haber and Associates.

  • References

    Mertens, Joan. 2012. "Recent Acquisitions, A Selection: 2010-2012." The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, 70(2): p. 10.

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