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School Groups

School Groups

Make the Met part of your school year! The Museum is currently accepting appointment requests for guided and self-guided visits to occur through June 26, 2014. Requests for summer 2014 will begin the second week of April.

The Met welcomes all school groups and invites you to request either a guided visit led by trained Museum staff or a self-guided visit, which allows you to lead your own students through the Museum. Please note that appointments are required for all school groups visiting the Museum. To request an appointment, please fill out the School Group Visit Request Form.

If you have any questions, you may email schoolvisits@metmuseum.org. Tourism professionals working with school groups visiting New York City must contact the Group Services office at 212-570-3711 or mettours@metmuseum.org to request appointments. Qualified tour operators are eligible for discounted rates.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art's school tour program is made possible by the generosity of Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman.


Guided Visits

Hour-long guided visits led by Museum staff offer extraordinary opportunities for students to make the most of their encounters with great works of art. Our educators engage students in learner-centered, inquiry-based conversations that foster curriculum connections and encourage important learning skills such as evidence-based reasoning and critical thinking. Guided visits also inspire students to build strong content knowledge across disciplines, and support their confidence, curiosity, and creativity.

Works of art at the Met are rich, primary-resource texts, and guided visits align with a range of state and national learning standards, including the following Common Core Learning Standards:

  • Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text (CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.1)
  • Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively (CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.SL.1).
  • Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally (CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.SL.2).

Guided visits are offered and recommended for students who are at or above first-grade level and last about an hour. Due to the demand for guided visits, each school is limited to three guided visits per semester. To request an appointment, please fill out the School Group Visit Request Form.

Group Size
A group may have no fewer than ten students and no more than fifty students, with one chaperone required for every ten students. The Museum reserves the right to limit the number of adult chaperones participating in school group guided visits.

Group Fee
All fees are waived for schools located within the five boroughs of New York City due to the generous support of Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman. Schools outside New York City pay the following group rates:

  • Students: $15 each
  • Required adult chaperones (one for every ten students): $15 each
  • One teacher per reservation receives complimentary admission.
  • Any additional adults: $28 each
  • Groups of 15 or fewer: $225 flat fee

Membership and other discounts do not apply to group admission.

Visit Schedule
Guided visits are conducted Monday through Friday, 9:45 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

Topics for Grades 1–3
These thematic tours introduce primary grade students to a variety of art from different cultures. Sketching is included. All materials are provided by the Museum.

Recommended for First-Time Visitors

  • Exploring Art across Cultures
    See the world! Develop visual-analysis and evidence-based reasoning skills during a thematic, cross-cultural exploration of the Met's collection.

Thematic Topics

  • Amazing Animals
    Take a walk on the wild side! Explore animal imagery in art at the Met.
  • Communities around the World
    What is a community? Explore possible answers by examining relevant artworks from around the globe and considering the ideas and activities that bring different groups of people together.
  • Faces and Masks
    What happens when art looks back at us? Find out as we come face-to-face with art from around the world.
  • Patterns
    How do artists use line, shape, and color to generate patterns in works of art? Discover the possibilities in two- and three-dimensional artworks.
  • Stories and Legends
    It's often said that a picture is worth a thousand words; discover the power of storytelling in art across cultures.

Topics for Grades 4–12
Students explore works of art through close observation and inquiry-based discussion.

Recommended for First-Time Visitors

  • Exploring Art across Cultures
    See the world! Develop visual-analysis and evidence-based reasoning skills during a thematic, cross-cultural exploration of the Met's collection.

The Ancient World

  • Ancient Egypt: Art for Eternity
    Uncover the relationships between daily life and the afterlife, the role of the pharaoh, and the powers of gods and goddesses in the art of ancient Egypt.
  • Ancient Greece and Rome: Art of Heroic Ideals
    Learn how the cultures of ancient Greece and Rome used visual art and mythology to understand concepts like beauty, death, and heroism.
  • Ancient Mesopotamia: Art of Power and Beliefs
    Explore the art of the ancient Near East, a diverse geographic region that includes the cultures of ancient Assyria, Babylonia, and Sumer, among others.
  • Art of the Ancient World: Connections across Cultures
    Unearth connections between different ancient cultures by examining relationships between the works of art they left behind. This tour can include objects from two to three of the following cultures: Egypt, Greece, Rome, and Mesopotamia.

Crossroads of Asia

  • Art of the Silk Road
    Investigate the objects, belief systems, and ideas that spread along trade routes on the ancient Silk Road for many hundreds of years. Consider the visual evidence of connections between China, India, Central Asia, and European cultures.
  • Art of the Islamic World
    Explore the dynamic intercultural exchange that helped shape both sacred and secular art in the Islamic world from as far west as Spain and Morocco to areas now occupied by India and Pakistan.
  • Art of China: Tradition and Innovation
    Examine the art of China, and consider the interplay of geography, tradition, and belief that helped shape this remarkable and inventive culture.
  • The Natural World in the Art of Asia
    Flowing water, lush trees, and scurrying wildlife: examine visions of the natural world in art from Japan, China, and beyond, and consider what these images tell us about their makers.

Perspectives on Europe

  • Art of Medieval Europe
    The art of the Middle Ages—a span of nearly twelve hundred years—reveals an age of profound social, religious, and artistic change. Trace the growth of this new visual vocabulary in the art of Medieval Europe.
  • European Art in the Renaissance (14th–16th Century)
    Witness the rebirth of the Classical world in Italy and across Europe. Consider notions of status, family, and identity in both secular and sacred art.
  • European Art in an Age of Reason and Religion (16th–19th Century)
    Explore the political, social, and scientific innovations in Europe during this time, and consider how they relate to shifts in artistic thinking.
  • Art of Spain: Converging Cultures
    From the Islamic design of pre-Catholic Spain to the vigor of painters like Velázquez and Picasso, discover why the history of art in Spain is a history of cultural convergences.
  • Art of France: Romance and Revolution
    Explore the culture of France through its art, tracing changing attitudes toward artistic expression from royal patronage to Impressionism and beyond.

African Experiences

  • African Art
    Examine powerful, communal, and spiritual art from the diverse cultures of sub-Saharan Africa, and reflect on what we can learn about the cultures that create it.

Connections in North and South America

  • American Art: Change and Continuity
    Chart the course of the United States of America through its art. Discover how this country has changed over hundreds of years, and consider what it means to be living in America.
  • Art of Native North America
    Experience the artistic achievements of native cultures in North America, and reflect on how these artworks incorporate symbols of the natural world. Groups limited to 25 people.
  • Art of Ancient Central and South America
    Discover gold, ceramic, and stone artworks from pre-Columbian cultures in Central and South America, and consider what we can learn about the beliefs of the Olmec, Maya, and Aztec civilizations.

Thematic Topics

  • Modern and Contemporary Art
    Break the rules! Explore how twentieth- and twenty-first-century artists have pushed boundaries and experimented with new ideas, materials, and notions about the very nature of art.
  • The Musical Museum
    Explore musical instruments across the Museum's collections and from a variety of cultures and time periods.

World of Art: Afternoon Guided Tours for High School Students
In these thematic, multicultural tours, high school students are divided into small groups to engage with great works of art. The Met's original artworks serve as excellent primary sources for students as they analyze, discuss, and make logical inferences based on what they see. Teachers are encouraged to book multiple visits. (Available Tuesday through Thursday, 1:30 or 2:00 p.m. only.)

  • Art of Power and Belief
    The concepts of power and belief are integral to many great works of art. This tour takes students on a cross-cultural journey as they look at how these concepts are portrayed in different eras and cultures.
  • The Artist Speaks
    Investigate how artists from around the world make choices, share ideas, and communicate cultural perspectives through the language of visual art.
  • The Human Figure
    The human body has been a source of inspiration for artists around the world. Students on this tour will look at a variety of artworks depicting the human figure and explore how those depictions relate to the cultures that produced them.

Request a visit appointment.


Self-Guided Visits

Teachers and their students may explore the Museum's encyclopedic collection independently. Please note that self-guided visits also require appointments. All teachers who participate in a K–12 educator program offered by the Museum receive priority registration for self-guided visits to the Museum.

Group Size
A self-guided group may have no fewer than ten students and no more than fifty students, with one chaperone required for every ten students. Each school is limited to one group of up to fifty students per day.

Group Fee
All fees are waived for schools located within the five boroughs of New York City due to the generous support of Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman. Schools outside New York City pay the following group rates:

  • Students: $9 each
  • Required adult chaperones (one for every 10 students): $9 each
  • One teacher per reservation receives complimentary admission.
  • Any additional adults: $20 each

Membership and other discounts do not apply to group admission.

Visit Schedule
Self-guided appointments are available Sunday through Thursday, 9:30 a.m.–3:45 p.m., and Friday and Saturday, 9:30 a.m.–7:00 p.m. The Museum cannot guarantee access to all galleries at all times.

Teacher Resources
Use the links below to selected pre-visit guides that will help you prepare for your self-guided visit with your students.

Request a visit appointment.


Questions?

Please see our Frequently Asked Questions page for more information about bringing your school group to the Museum.


The Cloisters Museum and Gardens

Self-guided school groups can visit The Cloisters museum and gardens for free within seven days of their scheduled visit to the Main Building provided that group members retain their tickets. Guided tours can also be arranged at reduced rates. For information, see Group Visits to The Cloisters. All group visits to The Cloisters require reservations.

Group Tours at The Cloisters

Explore The Cloisters museum and gardens, the Museum's northern-Manhattan branch dedicated to medieval art and architecture, on a guided or self-guided visit with your group.

Spring K–12 Educator Programs

Register for an onsite spring K–12 educator program!

See a list of upcoming K–12 educator programs.