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Teen Blog

A Love Letter to The Love Letter

Emily Z., TAG Member; and Shivanna, TAG Member

Posted: Friday, April 11, 2014

Walking through the galleries of eighteenth-century French art, we fell in love with The Love Letter, Jean Honoré Fragonard's feathery depiction of a flirtatious young lady. What first caught our eyes was the golden light that illuminates her pale skin and rosy cheeks. The beautiful light flows through the painting and brings out the yellow, brown, and pink tones of the work. The combination of colors is simply breathtaking.

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Teen Blog

An Intriguingly Hellish Landscape

Natalee, TAG Member; and Maleficent Twemlow (a.k.a. Anna), TAG Member

Posted: Friday, April 4, 2014

​When we recently walked through gallery 642 in European Paintings, this painting in particular caught our eye. We found it so eye-catching because of its distinctive, dark color palette that makes it stand out from the rest of the gallery, and also because of its surreal and macabre subject matter.

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Teen Blog

A True Pioneer

Emily Z., TAG Member

Posted: Friday, March 28, 2014

The sculpture Pioneer Woman in the current exhibition The American West in Bronze, 1850–1925 caught my attention because it depicts a woman. Before you roll your eyes and claim that I am stating the obvious, bear with me! The field of American Western art is dominated by renditions of men and animals, so Bryant Baker's sculpture offers a unique approach to capturing the West. The very fact that Pioneer Woman focuses on a pioneer woman makes it noteworthy, but the meaning of the work is more elusive than just its subject matter.

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Teen Blog

Reflections on the West through Bronze

Karl, TAG Member

Posted: Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Sculptures capture emotions and body movements, which, in my opinion, makes them more relatable than paintings. The sculptures in the exhibition The American West in Bronze, 1850–1925 really evoke the American West, and the details bring the pieces to life. Cast in different sizes and displayed on pedestals of different heights, the pieces create an effect like a mountain range. The ridges and valleys work to draw your attention to each piece, no matter its size, and the lack of conformity allows the viewer to allocate time to each sculpture and absorb its details.

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Teen Blog

The American West: Times Change, Places Change, and We Reflect

Natalee, TAG Member; and Tiffany, TAG Member

Posted: Tuesday, March 11, 2014

The first object seen upon entering the exhibition The American West in Bronze, 1850–1925 is a buffalo, perhaps one of the most important symbols of the American West. This sculpture, Henry Merwin Shrady's Buffalo, stands in front of a blown-up chromolithograph of a herd of wild buffalo, and showcases the exhibition's unique point of view, blending the artists' and patrons' fondest memories and wildest dreams of what the vast, "untouched" frontier meant. Nostalgia and excitement abound in the exhibition, as brave pioneers conquer the West and search for the American Dream.

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Teen Blog

Impressions of Ink Art

Jill, TAG Member

Posted: Friday, February 21, 2014

The exhibition Ink Art: Past as Present in Contemporary China is all about ink. Darks and lights and midtones are used everywhere. There are so many different art styles that you're bound to find something you like. The exhibition features several scrolls, which tell stories through writing or pictures and even through combinations of the two.

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Teen Blog

A Glimpse of China: Duan Jianyu's Beautiful Dream 3

Karl, TAG Member

Posted: Thursday, February 13, 2014

Duan Jianyu's Beautiful Dream series in the exhibition Ink Art: Past as Present in Contemporary China is surprisingly beautiful given the fact that it was painted on old corrugated cardboard boxes.

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Teen Blog

Book from the Sky: A Story with No Words

Natalee, TAG Member; Brooke, TAG Member; and Tiffany, TAG Member

Posted: Friday, February 7, 2014

Before we encountered Xu Bing's Book from the Sky, we passed by Ai Weiwei's Han Jar Overpainted with Coca-Cola Logo—and almost missed it. The pot, located in the ancient Chinese galleries, looks ordinary except for its iconic logo. This was where we started to learn that the contemporary Chinese art scene is born from the synthesis and refutation of tradition.

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Teen Blog

Tradition and Identity in Ink Art

Angeles, TAG Member; and Jacqui, Teen Program Participant

Posted: Friday, January 31, 2014

In Ink Art: Past as Present in Contemporary China, we came across many pieces of artwork that exemplify the contrast between contemporary and traditional art. One of these pieces was Family Tree, a series of nine photographs in which the artist Zhang Huan's face gradually becomes covered in ink and traditional calligraphy.

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Teen Blog

Ink Art's Merging of the Old and the New

Emily Z., TAG Member; Sage, TAG Member; and Genevieve, TAG Member

Posted: Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Upon first seeing Han Jar Overpainted with Coca-Cola Logo in the special exhibition Ink Art: Past as Present in Contemporary China, we were overwhelmingly reminded of one of the larger themes of modern Chinese art: the conflict between the progression of the modern and the preservation of the traditional. This Han dynasty pot emblazoned with the faded Coca-Cola logo struck us as an almost humorous representation of this conflict.

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Teen Blog

Contrast and Balance in Jewels by JAR

Chantal Stein, College Intern

Posted: Tuesday, January 14, 2014

It takes a minute for your eyes to adjust to the darkness in the exhibition Jewels by JAR (on view through March 9, 2014). The walls are black, the ceilings are high, and glass cases lined with red velvet are set into walls and columns. Warm lights behind the glass spotlight the artwork within.

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Teen Blog

How Did He Paint That?

Lawrence, Former High School Intern

Posted: Tuesday, December 31, 2013

There are a handful of paintings at the Met that made a huge impression on me when I first saw them. Two of them are Sanford Robinson Gifford's A Gorge in the Mountains (Kauterskill Clove) and Frederic Edwin Church's The Aegean Sea. Every time I see these paintings, I ask myself, "How did he paint that?!"

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Teen Blog

My Favorite Room at the Met

Lucie, Former High School Intern

Posted: Monday, December 23, 2013

My favorite room at the Met is gallery 735 because it houses John Vanderlyn's Panoramic View of the Palace and Gardens of Versailles. I first visited the gallery on the recommendation of a friend, and since then I've been back many times.

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Teen Blog

Diary of a Ceiling Fan

Helen, Former High School Intern

Posted: Monday, December 16, 2013

I constantly find myself looking up at the ceilings whenever I visit The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Turning my gaze upward allows me to clear my thoughts and forget about any commotion around me.

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Teen Blog

An International Take on Textiles

Brooke, TAG Member; and Tiffany, TAG Member

Posted: Monday, November 18, 2013

Though we tend to associate globalization with the modern, Western-dominated world of capital goods, in reality it began long ago with textiles. The current exhibition Interwoven Globe: The Worldwide Textile Trade, 1500–1800 is the first major exhibition to explore this international exchange of design ideas through the medium of textiles.

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Teen Blog

A Profusion of Blue and Yellow Feathers

Angeles, TAG Member; and Jill, TAG Member

Posted: Tuesday, November 12, 2013

The panels on view in the exhibition Feathered Walls: Hangings from Ancient Peru were created by the Wari peoples of southern Peru. Their makers hand-knotted blue and yellow macaw feathers one by one onto cotton and camelid hair using slipped overhand knots. The strings of feathers were then sewn in horizontal rows onto large cotton panels.

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Teen Blog

What Does One Do with a Wall Full of Feathers?

Sage, TAG Member

Posted: Thursday, October 31, 2013

Many questions surround the beautiful feather panels, created between about 600 and 1000 by the Wari peoples of Peru, that are currently on view in the exhibition Feathered Walls: Hangings from Ancient Peru. The simplistic juxtapositions of color and painstaking care put into them tantalize the mind and make one wonder what purpose the panels served.

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Teen Blog

A New Perspective on an Ancient Object

Maleficent Twemlow (a.k.a. Anna), TAG Member

Posted: Thursday, October 24, 2013

As a preface, I would just like to ask that you not take my excitement about the work above to be some kind of authoritative perspective on it—in other words, that you'll visit the Museum, see this piece and have a great, transcendent epiphany with the swelling baritone of a hallelujah chorus behind you. Perhaps it's just me being overzealous and getting unnecessarily pumped up about something as usual. But, for a second, let's be indulgent and allow me to express how this piece requires you to reconfigure your mind, and just how weird and interesting it is. Let's break it down for a second, shall we?

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Teen Blog

Chodhisone: Our 3D Creation in Plastic

Sage, TAG Member; and Katy, Teen Program Participant

Posted: Wednesday, October 16, 2013

The idea for our 3D sculpture came together after taking pictures of a Chinese chimera and a bodhisattva from the Asian Art galleries, along with Ritual Seat for a Noble (Osa' osa), currently on view in the Met's Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas galleries. From there, we took each of the photos and stitched them together using 3D printing software.

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Teen Blog

Monster in a Monster

Angeles, TAG Member; and Briana, Teen Program Participant

Posted: Wednesday, October 9, 2013

The inspiration for our 3D scanning and printing workshop project came from our mutual interest in both Asian and Greek mythology. Although we came across many potential subjects while getting to know the Museum's collection, we quickly decided to base our plastic sculpture on Greek mythological figures and Buddhist deities—combining animal and human forms to create a supernatural god.

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About this Blog

This blog, written by the Metropolitan Museum's Teen Advisory Group (TAG) and occasional guest authors, is a place for teens to talk about art at the Museum and related topics.