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Teen Blog

A Love Letter to The Love Letter

Emily Z., TAG Member; and Shivanna, TAG Member

Posted: Friday, April 11, 2014

Walking through the galleries of eighteenth-century French art, we fell in love with The Love Letter, Jean Honoré Fragonard's feathery depiction of a flirtatious young lady. What first caught our eyes was the golden light that illuminates her pale skin and rosy cheeks. The beautiful light flows through the painting and brings out the yellow, brown, and pink tones of the work. The combination of colors is simply breathtaking.

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Teen Blog

An Intriguingly Hellish Landscape

Natalee, TAG Member; and Maleficent Twemlow (a.k.a. Anna), TAG Member

Posted: Friday, April 4, 2014

​When we recently walked through gallery 642 in European Paintings, this painting in particular caught our eye. We found it so eye-catching because of its distinctive, dark color palette that makes it stand out from the rest of the gallery, and also because of its surreal and macabre subject matter.

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Teen Blog

A True Pioneer

Emily Z., TAG Member

Posted: Friday, March 28, 2014

The sculpture Pioneer Woman in the current exhibition The American West in Bronze, 1850–1925 caught my attention because it depicts a woman. Before you roll your eyes and claim that I am stating the obvious, bear with me! The field of American Western art is dominated by renditions of men and animals, so Bryant Baker's sculpture offers a unique approach to capturing the West. The very fact that Pioneer Woman focuses on a pioneer woman makes it noteworthy, but the meaning of the work is more elusive than just its subject matter.

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Teen Blog

Reflections on the West through Bronze

Karl, TAG Member

Posted: Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Sculptures capture emotions and body movements, which, in my opinion, makes them more relatable than paintings. The sculptures in the exhibition The American West in Bronze, 1850–1925 really evoke the American West, and the details bring the pieces to life. Cast in different sizes and displayed on pedestals of different heights, the pieces create an effect like a mountain range. The ridges and valleys work to draw your attention to each piece, no matter its size, and the lack of conformity allows the viewer to allocate time to each sculpture and absorb its details.

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Teen Blog

The American West: Times Change, Places Change, and We Reflect

Natalee, TAG Member; and Tiffany, TAG Member

Posted: Tuesday, March 11, 2014

The first object seen upon entering the exhibition The American West in Bronze, 1850–1925 is a buffalo, perhaps one of the most important symbols of the American West. This sculpture, Henry Merwin Shrady's Buffalo, stands in front of a blown-up chromolithograph of a herd of wild buffalo, and showcases the exhibition's unique point of view, blending the artists' and patrons' fondest memories and wildest dreams of what the vast, "untouched" frontier meant. Nostalgia and excitement abound in the exhibition, as brave pioneers conquer the West and search for the American Dream.

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Teen Blog

Impressions of Ink Art

Jill, TAG Member

Posted: Friday, February 21, 2014

The exhibition Ink Art: Past as Present in Contemporary China is all about ink. Darks and lights and midtones are used everywhere. There are so many different art styles that you're bound to find something you like. The exhibition features several scrolls, which tell stories through writing or pictures and even through combinations of the two.

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Teen Blog

A Glimpse of China: Duan Jianyu's Beautiful Dream 3

Karl, TAG Member

Posted: Thursday, February 13, 2014

Duan Jianyu's Beautiful Dream series in the exhibition Ink Art: Past as Present in Contemporary China is surprisingly beautiful given the fact that it was painted on old corrugated cardboard boxes.

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Teen Blog

Book from the Sky: A Story with No Words

Natalee, TAG Member; Brooke, TAG Member; and Tiffany, TAG Member

Posted: Friday, February 7, 2014

Before we encountered Xu Bing's Book from the Sky, we passed by Ai Weiwei's Han Jar Overpainted with Coca-Cola Logo—and almost missed it. The pot, located in the ancient Chinese galleries, looks ordinary except for its iconic logo. This was where we started to learn that the contemporary Chinese art scene is born from the synthesis and refutation of tradition.

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Teen Blog

Tradition and Identity in Ink Art

Angeles, TAG Member; and Jacqui, Teen Program Participant

Posted: Friday, January 31, 2014

In Ink Art: Past as Present in Contemporary China, we came across many pieces of artwork that exemplify the contrast between contemporary and traditional art. One of these pieces was Family Tree, a series of nine photographs in which the artist Zhang Huan's face gradually becomes covered in ink and traditional calligraphy.

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Teen Blog

Ink Art's Merging of the Old and the New

Emily Z., TAG Member; Sage, TAG Member; and Genevieve, TAG Member

Posted: Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Upon first seeing Han Jar Overpainted with Coca-Cola Logo in the special exhibition Ink Art: Past as Present in Contemporary China, we were overwhelmingly reminded of one of the larger themes of modern Chinese art: the conflict between the progression of the modern and the preservation of the traditional. This Han dynasty pot emblazoned with the faded Coca-Cola logo struck us as an almost humorous representation of this conflict.

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About this Blog

This blog, written by the Metropolitan Museum's Teen Advisory Group (TAG) and occasional guest authors, is a place for teens to talk about art at the Museum and related topics.