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European Sculpture and Decorative Arts

ESDA

The fifty thousand objects in the Museum's comprehensive and historically important collection of European sculpture and decorative arts reflect the development of a number of art forms in Western European countries from the early fifteenth through the early twentieth century. The holdings include sculpture in many sizes and media, woodwork and furniture, ceramics and glass, metalwork and jewelry, horological and mathematical instruments, and tapestries and textiles. Ceramics made in Asia for export to European markets and sculpture and decorative arts produced in Latin America during this period are also included among these works.

Now at the Met

Art Song in Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux's France

Michael Cirigliano II, Website Editor, Digital Media Department

Posted: Friday, April 18, 2014

The mid-nineteenth century was a period of incredible stagnation for French music, especially for those composers working in the vocal arts. Only five new French operas were commissioned by the Opéra Comique in Paris between 1852 and 1870, and France had yet to forge their own style of art song, despite the widespread interest German composers had developed in the musical form earlier in the century. However, the passage of multiple revolutions and failed empires in the mid-nineteenth century gave French artists across all disciplines a spectrum of intense emotions to convey, and the wealth of art song in the country quickly began to accumulate.

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Now at the Met

Tapestries Report All the News That's Fit to Weave

Sarah Mallory, Research Assistant, European Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Posted: Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Before the advent of Facebook and Twitter, Pinterest and Instagram, television, or the daily paper, looking at tapestries was one way to learn about the news of the day, observe fashionable trends in clothing and interior design, and perhaps even make a political statement. Since it is #tapestrytuesday, let's examine how the social medium that is a tapestry just might have been an early form of social media.

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Now at the Met

Making a Tapestry—How Did They Do That?

Sarah Mallory, Research Assistant, European Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Posted: Tuesday, February 18, 2014

You are walking through a museum, your mind lost in thought (your feet perhaps aching ever so slightly), when suddenly you look up and see a fascinating object. You immediately begin trying to identify the specimen set before you: it's a fabric . . . no, it's an embroidery . . . wait . . . it's . . . the wall label says it's a tapestry! A tapestry?

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Digital Underground

Creative Technologist Interview: Daniele Frazier's Implied Water

Don Undeen, Senior Manager of Media Lab, Digital Media

Posted: Wednesday, January 8, 2014

It should come as no surprise at this point that I'm interested in digital modeling and 3D printing; I like the idea that objects in the Met's collection can be used as inspiration and raw material for new works. For that reason, when I recognized a model of a Met object at 3D Notion, a recent exhibition of 3D-printed works at the Bruce High Quality Foundation University, I was immediately intrigued.

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Now at the Met

Introducing #tapestrytuesday

Sarah Mallory, Research Assistant, European Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Posted: Tuesday, January 7, 2014

A riddle, if you will: What type of artwork did Henry VIII love so much that he owned at least 2,500 examples, and Louis XIV and the Medici family value so immensely that they each established their own production workshops?

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Teen Blog

An International Take on Textiles

Brooke, TAG Member; and Tiffany, TAG Member

Posted: Monday, November 18, 2013

Though we tend to associate globalization with the modern, Western-dominated world of capital goods, in reality it began long ago with textiles. The current exhibition Interwoven Globe: The Worldwide Textile Trade, 1500–1800 is the first major exhibition to explore this international exchange of design ideas through the medium of textiles.

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Teen Blog

Monster in a Monster

Angeles, TAG Member; and Briana, Teen Program Participant

Posted: Wednesday, October 9, 2013

The inspiration for our 3D scanning and printing workshop project came from our mutual interest in both Asian and Greek mythology. Although we came across many potential subjects while getting to know the Museum's collection, we quickly decided to base our plastic sculpture on Greek mythological figures and Buddhist deities—combining animal and human forms to create a supernatural god.

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Teen Blog

Special (Little) Exhibitions

Julia, High School Intern

Posted: Tuesday, January 29, 2013

Have a favorite nook at the Met? A quiet space where you can truly be alone with the pieces? Whether your answer to this question is "yes" or "no," I suggest you explore the smaller special exhibitions scattered throughout the Metropolitan Museum.

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Teen Blog

Connections

Jimmy, TAG Member; Emily R., Former TAG Member; and Audrey, TAG Member

Posted: Monday, August 20, 2012

As frequent visitors to the Met, we often create personal connections with the works of art we see in the galleries. In the Teen Advisory Group's recent photo adventure throughout the Museum, we attempted to integrate the works of art into our own reality.

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Now at the Met

Featured Publication—Interview with the Photographer: Joe Coscia

Nadja Hansen, Editorial Assistant, Editorial Department

Posted: Wednesday, March 28, 2012

Chief Photographer Joe Coscia has worked at the Museum for more than twenty years. One of his recent assignments was to photograph the works of art for Masterpieces of European Sculpture in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1400–1900, written by Ian Wardropper and published last fall. I asked him about the unique work of a museum photographer, as well as the collaborations and complex choices involved in shooting the masterpieces illustrated in this book.

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