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The Spring (La Source)

Jean Marc Nattier (French, Paris 1685–1766 Paris)

Date:
1738
Medium:
Oil on canvas
Dimensions:
31 3/4 x 25 5/8 in. (80.6 x 65.1 cm)
Classification:
Paintings
Credit Line:
Gift of Jessie Woolworth Donahue, 1956
Accession Number:
56.100.2
  • Gallery Label

    Reportedly, the canvas was signed and dated 1738 on the reverse. The traditional identification of the sitter as Louise Henriette de Bourbon-Conti is not tenable and the picture, which is rather loosely and fluidly painted, was probably made for the art market.

  • Catalogue Entry

    In the catalogue of the 1918 Paris sale of the vicomte de Curel, where the picture first appeared, it was said to have been signed and dated Nattier 1738 on the reverse (the inscription is no longer visible owing to the presence of a lining canvas). The sitter was identified as the princesse de Bourbon-Conti. Nattier specialized in a form of allegorical guise whereby his sitters, often shown as here in a white chemise, were presented as goddesses or personifications. The presence of reeds and a vessel from which water flows identify this young woman as the spring, or "la source." The proposed identification depends upon comparison with other portraits, notably one showing the duchesse de Chartres, as she then was, as Hebe (Nationalmuseum, Stockholm), which is signed and dated 1744. On this basis, it must be set aside, as there is no resemblance.

    [2014]

  • Provenance

    ?marquise de Toulongeon, née des Verfers; Albert de Curel, vicomte de Curel (until d. 1908; his estate sale, Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, May 3, 1918, postponed until November 25, 1918, no. 43, as "la Princesse de Bourbon-Conti," and signed, on the reverse, "Nattier, pinxit, 1738, à Paris," for Fr 125,000 to Trotti); [Trotti, Paris, 1918–20]; [Knoedler, New York, 1920–24]; Mr. and Mrs. Edward S. Harkness, New York (1924–35); [Knoedler, New York, 1935–39]; Jessie Woolworth (Mrs. James P.) Donahue, New York (1939–56)

  • Exhibition History

    London. Knoedler. "Masterpieces through Four Centuries (1400–1800)," May 29–June 29, 1935, no. 13 (lent from a private collection).

  • References

    "A Beautiful Nattier for America." International Studio 75 (April 1922), p. 153, ill. in color on cover, as Princess de Bourbon-Conti.

    Art News 33 (June 8, 1935), p. 10, ill.

    "Additions to the Collections." Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin 15 (October 1956), p. 42.

    Pontus Grate. "Nattier and the Goddess of Eternal Youth." Thought and Form [Nationalmuseum Bulletin, Stockholm] 3, no. 3 (1979), p. 155, fig. 6, compares it to another Nattier portrait of Louise Henriette de Bourbon-Conti as Hebe (Nationalmuseum, Stockholm, 1744).

    Xavier Salmon. Jean-Marc Nattier, 1685–1766. Exh. cat., Musée national des châteaux de Versailles et de Trianon. Paris, 1999, pp. 190, 249–250, 373, fig. 4, comments on the frequency with which women of the period were depicted "en source", in Nattier's case, for example, in works dating from 1734, 1739, 1740, and 1747.



  • Notes

    There are traces of a signature and date at lower left.

    Louise Henriette de Bourbon-Conti was born on June 20, 1726, the only daughter of Louis Armand II de Bourbon, prince de Conti, and of Louise Élisabeth, daughter of Louis III de Bourbon, prince de Condé. She married in 1743 Louis Philippe (1725–1785), duc de Chartres, becoming duchesse de Chartres and in 1752 duchesse d'Orléans. She was the mother of Philippe Égalité (1747–1793) and the grandmother of Louis Philippe (1773–1850).

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    Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History
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