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Asian Art

Asian

The collection of Asian art at the Metropolitan Museum—more than 35,000 objects, ranging in date from the third millennium B.C. to the twenty-first century—is one of the largest and is the most comprehensive in the West. Each of the many civilizations of Asia is represented by outstanding works, providing an unrivaled experience of the artistic traditions of nearly half the world.

Now at the Met

The Shapes of Things, or, How the Ding Met the Tureen

Denise Patry Leidy, Curator, Department of Asian Art

Posted: Friday, May 29, 2015

This spring, the subject of cultural exchange between China and the West has been a hot topic thanks to the exhibition China: Through the Looking Glass, a collaboration between The Costume Institute and the Department of Asian Art. Yet fashion is by no means the only arena in which Western artists have been inspired by Chinese objects. For instance, bronze ritual vessels known as ding (figs. 1 and 2), which emerged during China's Bronze Age (ca. 1600–221 B.C.), have long inspired objects ranging from Korean chaekgori screens to Viennese bowls.

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Now at the Met

Crossing Cultures—Platon for China: Through the Looking Glass

Rachel High, Editorial Assistant, Editorial Department

Posted: Thursday, May 7, 2015

Best known for his compelling portraits of world leaders, Platon spent several months photographing couture garments from designers such as Christian Dior, Jean Paul Gaultier, Karl Lagerfeld, Alexander McQueen, and Yves Saint Laurent, as well as traditional Chinese costume and decorative art objects. I spoke with him about the book, his work, and the importance of artists as cultural mediators.

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Met Museum Presents Blog

Introducing the Met Museum Presents 2015–16 Season

Limor Tomer, General Manager of Concerts & Lectures

Posted: Wednesday, April 29, 2015

This morning Met Museum Presents announced our new season of performance and talks at the Met. Because we call the Met home, we get to reinvent what performance means at the Museum each season, and we are continuing to lead with curiosity and innovation through powerful performances, new commissions, and fearless artists, all taking the many spaces across the Metropolitan Museum as inspiration for a vibrant season. Next season we continue to present "only at the Met" experiences—singular performances and events that entice you to take in the "where" as well as the "what." The upcoming season pretty much proves that there is no normal, no static model, and no predetermined series.

I'm excited to share a few highlights of our upcoming programs, and I hope that you will join us for an incredible 2015–16 season.

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Now at the Met

Asian Art Centennial: One Hundred Years of Tibetan Art at the Met

Kurt Behrendt, Associate Curator, Department of Asian Art

Posted: Tuesday, April 14, 2015

In 1915, the president of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Robert de Forest, turned his attention to Asia and acquired a large group of Nepalese and Tibetan gem-studded objects. Among them was this dazzling ornament for the forehead of a sculpture. It presents the four directional Buddhas in diamonds, rubies, sapphires, emeralds, as well as auspicious materials such as red coral and turquoise. At the center, the cosmic axis of the universe, is a vajra featuring a large diamond surrounded by lapis lazuli—a clear reference to Vajrayana Buddhism as the diamond path.

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Teen Blog

A Piece of Peace

Kayla L., High School Intern

Posted: Friday, March 13, 2015

Millions call New York City, one of the greatest cities in the world, "the Big Apple" and home. In a city known for skyscrapers, amazing scenery, and people on the go, sometimes New Yorkers need a little peace. Between bus horns, cars honking, and people talking, finding a place to relax can be hard. As a junior in high school, the year when college becomes a priority, I am even more stressed with SAT/ACT prep, AP classes, and keeping a high GPA. Central Park, a supposed offer of beautiful scenery and serenity, is hardly ever quiet because events are always happening. Home is an alternative, but sometimes being home can lead to distractions—family, house duties, annoying parents, and siblings. Despite all of my chaos, finding peace became possible thanks to the Met.

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Now at the Met

Evoking the Divine: Mental Purification Using a Tibetan Tsakali Mandala

Kurt Behrendt, Associate Curator, Department of Asian Art

Posted: Friday, March 13, 2015

Tsakali cards were used by a practitioner, usually a monk or nun, under the guidance of a teacher to evoke a Buddhist deity. As these teachers traveled from one monastery to the next, using sets of portable tsakali cards was an efficient way of presenting the vast pantheon of Buddhist gods.

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Now at the Met

Nine "Secrets" about the History of the Met's Department of Asian Art

Mike Hearn, Douglas Dillon Chairman of the Department of Asian Art

Posted: Friday, February 20, 2015

In preparing a history of the Museum's Department of Asian Art, which this year celebrates its centennial by showcasing its unparalleled collection through a range of exhibitions, gallery talks, and other offerings, I have uncovered a number of little-known facts and many "secrets" that are not widely known to the public. Here are nine of the most fascinating.

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Now at the Met

Diamond in the Rust: Conserving a Damascened Tibetan Knife

Marlene April Yandrisevits, Former Graduate Intern, Department of Objects Conservation

Posted: Friday, February 6, 2015

Looking closely at historical artifacts is one of the chief privileges and joys of being an art conservator, and I am thrilled to share with you a close look at one of the extraordinary objects currently on view in the exhibition Sacred Traditions of the Himalayas. While this ritual blade is immediately striking in its sinuous form and elaborate decoration, closer examination reveals an inspiring display of technical skill and master artistry.

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Now at the Met

Understanding and Sustaining Cultures: The Conservation of Nepalese Jewelry

Nina Pascucci, Former College Intern, Department of Objects Conservation

Posted: Friday, January 30, 2015

I've always been drawn to the role that art and artifacts play in shaping our collective history and culture. As a college intern in the Department of Objects Conservation here at the Met, I recently had the unique opportunity to spend some one-on-one time with beautiful jewelry from Nepal while assisting with the preparation for the exhibition Sacred Traditions of the Himalayas.

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Now at the Met

Creating Contrast through Elaborate Details: Technical Analysis and Conservation of an Avalokitesvara

Mandira Chhabra, Assistant Conservator, Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya (CSMVS), Mumbai, India; Daniel Hausdorf, Associate Conservator, Department of Objects Conservation; and Pascale Patris, Conservator, Department of Objects Conservation

Posted: Friday, January 23, 2015

This beautiful image of the bodhisattva Avalokitesvara holds a lotus as his principal attribute (fig. 1). On view in the exhibition Sacred Traditions of the Himalayas, the gilded figure and its lotus-inspired pedestal are made of a single block of sandalwood, a wood species that holds spiritual meaning throughout Asia. The exceptional carving found here is a rare surviving example of a Nepalese tradition with a long history, one which ultimately can be traced back to India.

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