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Michael Cirigliano II

Michael Cirigliano II is the website editor in the Digital Media Department. 

Met Museum Presents Blog

Attacca Quartet Begins Yearlong Residency with Exploration of Haydn

Michael Cirigliano II, Website Editor, Digital Media Department

Posted: Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Few composers have an output of chamber music with such singular impact as Franz Joseph Haydn's string quartet cycle. The sixty-eight quartets, written over the course of nearly forty years, are so revered in the musical canon that the composer has become well known as the "Father of the String Quartet." As part of their yearlong relationship with the Museum, Attacca Quartet—the Met Museum Presents 2014–15 Quartet in Residence—will perform two concerts of Haydn's music which will include three quartets as well as the string-quartet version of the transformative Seven Last Words of Christ on the Cross, presented with an evocative video environment by Ofri Cnaani.

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Now at the Met

Hokusai and Debussy's Evocations of the Sea

Michael Cirigliano II, Website Editor, Digital Media Department

Posted: Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Numerous representations of the sea are woven into the work of Claude Debussy (1862–1918). The French composer regularly referenced his awe of the sea and its power, and even noted that he had "intended for the noble career of a sailor" in a 1912 letter to close friend and composer André Messager. Although the sea had already played a recurring character throughout much of his piano music, the first appearance of this subject in Debussy's orchestral output was the final movement of his 1899 work Trois Nocturnes, "Sirènes," in which he gave life to the deadly mythological seductresses by adding a wordless female choir to the standard orchestral forces.

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Now at the Met

Solace and Silence: The Music of Arvo Pärt

Michael Cirigliano II, Website Editor, Digital Media Department

Posted: Friday, May 30, 2014

"Feel the World Stand Still"

This phrase is currently emblazoned on subway ads across New York City promoting the Arvo Pärt Project at St. Vladimir's Seminary, which will bring the Estonian composer to New York for the first time since 1984. While this kind of dramatic hyperbole often surrounds any discourse regarding Pärt's music—"mystical," "heavenly," "timeless" are frequently used—the overwhelming acceptance of his work is a rare occurrence in the landscape of contemporary concert performance. His is a music that seamlessly bridges the gap between the modern and the ancient, minimalism and Gregorian chant, making the comparisons often cited between Pärt's music and that of both Phillip Glass and Josquin dez Prez the equivalent of an artist being equally heralded alongside Rothko and Caravaggio.

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Now at the Met

Art Song in Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux's France

Michael Cirigliano II, Website Editor, Digital Media Department

Posted: Friday, April 18, 2014

The mid-nineteenth century was a period of incredible stagnation for French music, especially for those composers working in the vocal arts. Only five new French operas were commissioned by the Opéra Comique in Paris between 1852 and 1870, and France had yet to forge their own style of art song, despite the widespread interest German composers had developed in the musical form earlier in the century. However, the passage of multiple revolutions and failed empires in the mid-nineteenth century gave French artists across all disciplines a spectrum of intense emotions to convey, and the wealth of art song in the country quickly began to accumulate.

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