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Ken Moore

Ken Moore is the Frederick P. Rose Curator in Charge of the Department of Musical Instruments.

Of Note

Good Vibrations: Free-Reed Instruments at the Met

Ken Moore, Frederick P. Rose Curator in Charge, Department of Musical Instruments; Jayson Dobney, Associate Curator and Administrator, Department of Musical Instruments; and Bradley Strauchen-Scherer, Associate Curator, Department of Musical Instruments

Posted: Thursday, December 10, 2015

The Department of Musical Instruments recently published a highlights guide, Musical Instruments: Highlights of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, which features approximately one hundred objects from around the world. Representing cultures from the ancient to the present, each object is accompanied by text that chronicles its historical, technological, or musical importance. Throughout the book, themes connect objects across time and place, and in the case of free-reed instruments, illustrate the cultural exchange of musical ideas.

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Of Note

The Status and Power of Ivory Trumpets

Ken Moore, Frederick P. Rose Curator in Charge, Department of Musical Instruments

Posted: Monday, September 21, 2015

The new exhibition Kongo: Power and Majesty, on view through January 3, 2016, displays several musical instruments, including a variety of ivory side-blown trumpets. While many were used as trade items produced for wealthy Europeans, such instruments also served as integral symbols of royal status and power in several sub-Saharan regions. A number of similar trumpets are also on view in The André Mertens Galleries for Musical Instruments.

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Of Note

The Many Sounds of Stone

Ken Moore, Frederick P. Rose Curator in Charge, Department of Musical Instruments

Posted: Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Stone is far from the first thing that springs to mind as one considers the materials needed for a musical instrument to make a pleasing sound, yet in many parts of the world this rigid element is often included in instrument making. On May 29, Glenn Kotche and Third Coast Percussion will perform a new composition inspired by one such instrument in the Museum's collection: the William Till rock harmonicon, made around 1880.

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Of Note

On Acquiring a Rare Early Seventeenth-Century Koto

Ken Moore, Frederick P. Rose Curator in Charge, Department of Musical Instruments

Posted: Monday, April 13, 2015

One of the most exquisite acquisitions made by the Department of Musical Instruments in the last decade was a spectacular koto, or long zither, from early seventeenth-century Japan. In addition to the instrument itself are many components, including an early nineteenth-century lacquered storage box, an eighteenth- and nineteenth-century silk brocade wrapping, and thirteen silver-tipped and -lined bridges. Each component is expertly decorated, and the process of exhibiting and photographing the beauty of these pieces is complicated. A stop-action video taken after a 2013 photo session reveals the various elements involved in packing the koto for transportation.

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Of Note

Grammy Winners at the Met

Ken Moore, Frederick P. Rose Curator in Charge, Department of Musical Instruments

Posted: Wednesday, February 4, 2015

This Sunday, February 8, marks the presentation of the fifty-seventh Grammy Awards. Although the ceremony is taking place in Los Angeles this year, here in New York, displayed among the treasures housed at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, are instruments once played by famous and influential musicians who have received or were nominated for Grammys during their careers.

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Of Note

Exploring The Sacred Lute

Ken Moore, Frederick P. Rose Curator in Charge, Department of Musical Instruments

Posted: Monday, August 11, 2014

The first time I heard the evocative sounds and exquisite poetry of classic Persian music, I was amazed by its simple and elegant beauty. I later learned the complexity and philosophical principals behind the music, and about the different genres and ancient regional traditions that still endure. After a trip to Iran to visit scholars, composers, instrument makers, and musicians, a friend introduced me to the music and life of the exceptional musician, jurist, and philosopher Nour Ali Elahi (1895–1974), also known as Ostad Elahi. The resulting new exhibition, The Sacred Lute: The Art of Ostad Elahi, examines Ostad's transformation of the art of tanbūr—his modifications to the instrument, its playing technique, and the elevation of its repertoire—as well as his innovative approach to the quest for self-knowledge and his personal transformation from a classical mystic to a modern jurist.

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Of Note

Instruments of Macabre Origin

Ken Moore, Frederick P. Rose Curator in Charge, Department of Musical Instruments

Posted: Monday, July 7, 2014

A highly unusual musical instrument in the Museum's collection is a lyre fashioned from a human skull. Although the piece has not been exhibited since before 1980, it gained fame in Jerzy Kosinski's 1982 best-selling novel Pinball—a rock 'n' roll mystery written for George Harrison—and perennially draws attention.

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Of Note

Kalimba, or the "Thumb Piano"

Ken Moore, Frederick P. Rose Curator in Charge, Department of Musical Instruments

Posted: Monday, May 12, 2014

In conjunction with the exhibition Early American Guitars: The Instruments of C. F. Martin, on view through December 7, the Department of Musical Instruments is presenting a series of monthly concerts on Friday evenings in the Museum's Charles Engelhard Court. The next concert in this series will be held on May 16, featuring the guitarist, composer, and instrument designer Trevor Gordon Hall.

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Of Note

Gallery Concert: Kakande Quartet Performs Music of the Mandé Empire

Ken Moore, Frederick P. Rose Curator in Charge, Department of Musical Instruments

Posted: Monday, March 3, 2014

On Wednesday, March 5, the Department of Musical Instruments will present a gallery concert featuring the Kakande Quartet, who will perform music from the Mandé Empire of West Africa. The ensemble is led by the renowned Guinean balofon player Famoro Dioubate. As a jali, or griot, Dioubate represents an eight-hundred-year lineage of musicians that serve as the primary storytellers and historians of their society.

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Of Note

Reminiscing on Andrés Segovia

Ken Moore, Frederick P. Rose Curator in Charge, Department of Musical Instruments

Posted: Friday, February 21, 2014

February 21 marks the birthday of classical guitarist Andrés Segovia (1893–1987). The Museum is home to two of his instruments—including the famed 1937 guitar made by Hermann Hauser, an instrument that Segovia called "the greatest guitar of our epoch."

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