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Alzahraa K. Ahmed

Alzahraa K. Ahmed is the 2015–16 Hagop Kevorkian Curatorial Fellow in the Department of Islamic Art.

RumiNations

Exploring Coptic Prayers Written on Venetian Paper

Alzahraa K. Ahmed, 2015–16 Hagop Kevorkian Curatorial Fellow, Department of Islamic Art

Posted: Tuesday, January 19, 2016

As climate change shows its devastating consequences the world over, it is not only our lives that are affected, but also our collective material culture and historical sites. Egypt is one of many countries now entering the wind and rain belt. Though still famous for its sweltering summer days and mostly moderate winters, Egypt has experienced biting cold and, more significantly, torrential rain that for many Egyptians (including me) is unprecedented.

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Byzantium and Islam Exhibition Blog

Figurines in the Mediterranean

Alzahraa K. Ahmed, 2015–16 Hagop Kevorkian Curatorial Fellow, Department of Islamic Art

Posted: Thursday, July 5, 2012

In many cases, burials have served as windows onto a past culture's daily life. Children's graves are no exception. Although attracting less archaeological attention than other finds, they provide abundant material that informs our understanding of the diverse activities and habits of people during the Greco-Roman, Byzantine, and Islamic eras.

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Byzantium and Islam Exhibition Blog

The Message: The Story of Islam, Directed by
Mustapha al-'Aqqad

Alzahraa K. Ahmed, 2015–16 Hagop Kevorkian Curatorial Fellow, Department of Islamic Art

Posted: Tuesday, July 3, 2012

"In the name of God, the most gracious, the most merciful, from Muhammad the Messenger of God to Heraclius the Emperor of Byzantium, greetings to him who is the follower of righteous guidance. I bid you to hear the divine call. I am the Messenger of God to the people. Accept Islam for your salvation."

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Byzantium and Islam Exhibition Blog

Saint Shenoute of Atripe

Alzahraa K. Ahmed, 2015–16 Hagop Kevorkian Curatorial Fellow, Department of Islamic Art

Posted: Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Scholars have debated whether Saint Shenoute of Atripe lived from 332–451 or 350–466—an astonishing length of time in either case—but all agree that he was one of the most important monastic reformers the Coptic Church has ever known.

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Byzantium and Islam Exhibition Blog

Hajj: A Journey to Meet God

Alzahraa K. Ahmed, 2015–16 Hagop Kevorkian Curatorial Fellow, Department of Islamic Art

Posted: Monday, April 16, 2012

The words "pilgrimage" and "sacred space," one evoking human movement and the other performative space, are inseparable from one another. Through pilgrimage, the pilgrim embarks on a spiritual path toward the full submission to God in an often-distant sacred space.

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Byzantium and Islam Exhibition Blog

Family and Children

Alzahraa K. Ahmed, 2015–16 Hagop Kevorkian Curatorial Fellow, Department of Islamic Art

Posted: Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Scholars have produced ample studies on the imperial and aristocratic life of Byzantium, focusing on buildings, endowments, clothes, and other aspects. While these studies provide essential insights into the Byzantine world, the empire did not consist solely of emperors, their entourages, or wealthy families, the dynatoi. Another view is offered through the lens of the non-elite society, which existed somewhat independently and shaped the Byzantine community economically, culturally, and socially.

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Byzantium and Islam Exhibition Blog

Sohag and Bawit

Alzahraa K. Ahmed, 2015–16 Hagop Kevorkian Curatorial Fellow, Department of Islamic Art

Posted: Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Travelers from Cairo to Upper Egypt inevitably pass through the cities Bawit and Sohag. These cities, which are not on most itineraries, do not house many pharaonic antiquities (aside from the great Temple of Siti I, in Sohag), but they do boast fascinating late antique monuments.

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