People
Staff

Mary Clare McKinley
Mary Clare McKinley | Guest Curator, Leonard A. Lauder Research Center for Modern Art

Mary Clare McKinley supports the Research Center's various initiatives, focusing primarily on research and exhibitions. Currently, she is developing plans for a dossier exhibition scheduled to open in May 2017. Prior to this role, she was part of the curatorial team for four recent shows at the Museum, including The Steins Collect: Matisse, Picasso, and the Parisian Avant-Garde (2011–12), Matisse: In Search of True Painting (2012–13), Venetian Glass by Carlo Scarpa: The Venini Company, 1932–1947  (2013–14), and Cubism: The Leonard A. Lauder Collection (2014–15). She is a graduate of Middlebury College and received her doctorate from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

© 2014 MMA, photograph by Jackie Neale

Lindsay Ganter
Lindsay Ganter | Assistant for Administration, Leonard A. Lauder Research Center for Modern Art

Lindsay Ganter works closely with the Advisory Committee to develop the Research Center’s Fellowship program, lecture series, and ongoing projects. Prior to joining the Leonard A. Lauder Research Center for Modern Art she held internships at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, the Guggenheim Museum, and the Grey Art Gallery. She earned an M.A. in the history of art from New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts, and a B.A. from the University of Richmond. Her Master’s thesis examined the relationship of James Turrell’s ongoing Skyspace series with contemporary artistic practices and historic architectural traditions. 

© 2015 MMA, photograph by Jackie Neale

Advisory Committee
Carrie Rebora Barratt
Carrie Rebora Barratt | Deputy Director for Collections and Administration, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Carrie Rebora Barratt serves as the Director's liaison to the Museum's core departments: Curatorial, Conservation, Scientific Research, Editorial, Libraries, Photo Studio, Antonio Ratti Textile Center, and the new department of Digital Media that she created in 2010. Prior to assuming this position in September 2009, Carrie was a Curator of American Paintings and Sculpture and Manager of The Henry R. Luce Center for the Study of American Art, with an extensive record of lectures and exhibitions, including American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life 1765–1915 (2009–10); Gilbert Stuart (2005); Queen Victoria and Thomas Sully (2001), and John Singleton Copley in America (1995–96), and thematic shows on folk art, portrait miniatures, period frames, and American drawings. A graduate of the University of Illinois at Chicago, she received her M.A. from the University of California at Los Angeles in 1984 and her Ph.D. from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York in 1990.

© 2013 MMA, photograph by Jackie Neale

Emily Braun
Emily Braun | Distinguished Professor, Hunter College and the Graduate Center, CUNY and Curator, The Leonard A. Lauder Collection

Distinguished Professor at Hunter College and the Graduate Center, CUNY, Emily Braun has served as the Curator of the Leonard A. Lauder Collection since 1987. In addition to her writings on Cubism, she has published extensively on twentieth-century Italian art, including her book Mario Sironi and Italian Modernism: Art and Politics under Fascism (2000) She is also the author of Thomas Hart Benton: The America Today Murals (1985) and co-curator of The Power of Conversation: Jewish Women and Their Salons (2005, Jewish Museum, New York) and co-author of its catalogue, which received a National Jewish Book Award. Her fellowships include a residency at the New York Public Library’s Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers and a Senior Research Grant from the Getty Foundation. Most recently, she co-curated Cubism: The Leonard A. Lauder Collection (2014–15). Its catalogue received The Association of Art Museum Curators’ First Place Award for Excellence and the New York State Historical Association’s Henry Allen Moe Prize. Curator of Alberto Burri: The Trauma of Painting, at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Braun also authored its publication, which was recognized with the 2016 Dedalus Foundation Exhibition Catalogue Award.

© 2014 MMA, photograph by Jackie Neale

Rebecca Rabinow
Rebecca Rabinow | Director, The Menil Collection

Rebecca Rabinow is the Director of the Menil Collection in Houston, Texas. Prior to joining the Menil, Rabinow was the founding Curator in Charge of the Leonard A. Lauder Research Center for Modern Art. As a member of the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s curatorial staff from 1990–2016, Dr. Rabinow helped organize more than twenty special exhibitions at the Museum. Her most recent award-winning shows include The Steins Collect: Matisse, Picasso, and the Parisian Avant-Garde in 2011–12 (recipient of the Dedalus Foundation's inaugural Exhibition Catalogue Award and the Frick Center for the History of Collecting’s Biennial Prize), Matisse: In Search of True Painting in 2012–13, and Cubism: The Leonard A. Lauder Collection in 2014–15 (the catalogue of which won The Association of Art Museum Curators’ First Place Award for Excellence as well as the New York State Historical Association’s Henry Allen Moe Prize). A graduate of Smith College and New York University's Institute of Fine Arts, Dr. Rabinow served as the Chairman of the Metropolitan Museum's Forum of Curators, Conservators, and Scientists in 2014–15.

Nancy Troy
Nancy Troy | Victoria and Roger Sant Professor in Art, Stanford University

Nancy J. Troy is Victoria and Roger Sant Professor in Art at Stanford University.  A specialist in modern art, architecture and design in Europe and America, Troy is the author of books about Dutch modernism, French decorative art, and the visual culture of haute couture.  Her latest book, The Afterlife of Piet Mondrian, examines the posthumous circulation of this Dutch painter’s work in both elite and popular spheres.  Former editor-in-chief of The Art Bulletin and former president of the National Committee for the History of Art, Troy has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, Institute for Advanced Study, Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, Getty Research Institute, American Council of Learned Societies, and National Endowment for the Humanities.

Sheena Wagstaff
Sheena Wagstaff | Leonard A. Lauder Chairman for Modern and Contemporary Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Sheena Wagstaff leads the Museum's program and collection of modern and contemporary art, including painting, sculpture, architecture, design, decorative arts, and multi-disciplinary installations. With the curatorial team, she is developing an international contemporary program, including art from across the Met's geographic and historic collections, for the Marcel Breuer museum building on Madison Avenue.

Before joining the Met, Wagstaff was Chief Curator of Tate Modern, London, responsible for the exhibitions program, Turbine Hall commissions, and contributing to the conceptual framework of Collection displays. With the Tate Director, she also worked as curatorial design client with architects Herzog & de Meuron on the new Tate Modern building, scheduled to open 2016. Over the course of her career, Wagstaff has worked for the Museum of Modern Art, Oxford; the Whitechapel Art Gallery, London; the Frick Art Museum, Pittsburgh; and Tate Britain, London. She has curated numerous exhibitions and written/edited catalogues.

© 2013 MMA, photograph by Jackie Neale

Current Fellows
Rachel Boate
Rachel Boate | Fellow 2016–18
Ph.D. Candidate, Institute of Fine Arts, NYU
Rachel Boate is a Ph.D. candidate in the history of art at the Institute of Fine Arts, NYU. Her dissertation explores the emergence of biomorphic form in the work of Jean Hélion, Fernand Léger, Joan Miró and Wassily Kandinsky during the 1930s, a moment when totalitarian regimes were advocating realism partially in order to inject propagandizing messages into recognizable, representational imagery. As a Leonard A. Lauder Fellow, she will continue her doctoral research on the legacy of Cubism in connection with the development of biomorphic abstraction in interwar Paris. Her work has been previously supported by grants from the Georges Lurcy Foundation, the Institut Remarque, and the CNRS in France.
Maria Castro
Maria Castro | Fellow 2016–18
Ph.D. Candidate, University of Pittsburgh
Maria Castro is a Ph.D. candidate in the history of art and architecture at the University of Pittsburgh. During her fellowship at the Leonard A. Lauder Research Center for Modern Art, she will focus on Tarsila do Amaral’s paintings of the 1920s, taking into account their relationship to works by Fernand Léger and other artists in Amaral’s circles. Castro’s dissertation, provisionally titled “Between Paris and São Paulo: Tarsila do Amaral’s Approach to Brasilidade,” analyzes Amaral’s engagement with Cubism, Surrealism, and avant-garde Realism during the interwar period. Attention will be paid to how Amaral engaged the forms and discourses of modernist movements while simultaneously addressing concerns over urbanization, industrialization, and shifting racial and gender identities from the perspective of local subjects. Castro is originally from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and holds a B.A. and M.A. from the University of Pittsburgh.
Samuel Johnson
Samuel Johnson | Fellow 2015–17

Samuel Johnson is a specialist in the art of the Russian and Soviet avant-gardes. He received his Ph.D. in the History of Art and Architecture from Harvard University in 2015 after completing a dissertation on the printed oeuvre of El Lissitzky. While in residence at the Leonard A. Lauder Research Center for Modern Art, he is completing revisions on a book manuscript on Lissitzky, provisionally titled El Lissitzky on Paper: Print Culture, Architecture, Politics, 1919–1933, which treats the artist’s theoretical and practical engagement with print culture as an alternative trajectory of the production art paradigm outlined by Soviet theorists in the mid-1920s. His essay, "El Lissitzky's Other Wolkenbügel: Reconstructing an Abandoned Proposal For a New Building Type," will appear in The Art Bulletin in Summer 2017.

Anna Jozefacka
Anna Jozefacka | Fellow 2015–17
Adjunct Associate Professor of Art History, Hunter College, CUNY

Anna Jozefacka is an art historian specializing in modern architecture, art, and design history. Her fellowship research will focus on Cubism’s relationship to the evolution of modern architecture and interior design during the first three decades of the twentieth century. Her recent publications include “Protean Prompt: The Matchbook as Commercial, Private, and Cultural Reminder,” Journal of Decorative and Propaganda Arts (2015), and numerous contributions to the Museum’s exhibition catalogue Cubism: The Leonard A. Lauder Collection (2014). Jozefacka has presented her research at national and international forums, including the annual conferences of the College Art Association (2013) and the Society of Architectural Historians (2006, 2012). In 2015 she co-chaired the symposium Charting Cubism across Central and Eastern Europe, sponsored by the Historians of German and Central European Art and Architecture (HGCEA) and the Museum’s Leonard A. Lauder Research Center for Modern Art. Jozefacka earned her doctorate from the Institute of Fine Arts, NYU, in 2011. She has received grants and fellowships from New York University, the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, and the Society of Architectural Historians.

Alumni
Trevor Stark
Trevor Stark | Leonard A. Lauder Fellow in Modern Art 2014–16
Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow, Columbia University
Trevor Stark was a 2014–16 Leonard A. Lauder Fellow in Modern Art. He received his Ph.D. from the Department of the History of Art and Architecture at Harvard University in 2016. Developing from his dissertation, Stark's first book project (forthcoming) analyzes the status of language in European avant-garde art from Cubism to Dada in relation to the historical reception of the poetics of Stéphane Mallarmé. His recent publications include articles on Pablo Picasso, Chris Marker, Hugo Ball, and Marcel Broodthaers. He is currently a 2016–18 Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Art History and Archaeology at Columbia University.
Verane Tasseau
Verane Tasseau | Leonard A. Lauder Fellow in Modern Art 2014–16
Independent Scholar

Vérane Tasseau graduated with a DEA in art history from Université Paris I Panthéon Sorbonne with a thesis on the relationship between French and American art in the 1950s. From 2001 to 2005, Tasseau worked as a curatorial assistant at the Picasso Museum, Paris, where she coordinated major exhibitions, including Matisse Picasso (2001, Tate Modern, London; Grand Palais, Paris; and MoMA, New York) and Picasso Surreal (2005, Beyeler Foundation Basel). In 2003, she received a grant from MoMA to assist with the reinstallation of the museum's permanent collection. Tasseau returned to MoMA in 2006 to work on the exhibition Georges Seurat: The Drawings. The Leonard A. Lauder Fellowship allowed Tasseau to pursue a research project on the four Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler sales held between 1921 and 1923 following the sequestration of his gallery's stock in 1914. Now a freelance art historian working in Paris and New York, Tasseau is also a part-time researcher for the Picasso Administration where she co-manages the library and writes for the Picasso Administration Journal. With Cécile Godefroy, she edited a special issue on Picasso's working techniques for Cahiers d'Art (December 2015).