Art/ Collection/ Art Object

Terracotta head of a woman

3rd–2nd century B.C.
Greek, South Italian, Tarentine
H. 10 1/2 in. (26.7 cm)
Credit Line:
Rogers Fund, 1923
Accession Number:
On view at The Met Fifth Avenue in Gallery 161
Since fine, hard stone such as marble was not readily available, Tarentine artists used terracotta for large-scale figures of high quality. The work to which this extraordinary head originally belonged may have been associated with a goddess, perhaps Aphrodite. Among the thousands of clay vases and figures found at Tarentum, subjects pertaining to the life of women, and specifically marriage, are prevalent.
Picón, Carlos A. 2007. Art of the Classical World in the Metropolitan Museum of Art: Greece, Cyprus, Etruria, Rome no. 194, pp. 167, 440, New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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