Art/ Collection/ Art Object
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Chest

Maker:
Attributed to the Searle-Dennis shop tradition
Maker:
William Searle (died 1667)
Artist:
Thomas Dennis (1638–1706)
Date:
1670–90
Geography:
Made in Ipswich, Massachusetts, United States
Culture:
American
Medium:
Red oak, white oak
Dimensions:
28 1/2 x 41 7/8 x 19 3/4 in. (72.4 x 106.4 x 50.2 cm)
Classification:
Furniture
Credit Line:
Gift of Mrs. Russell Sage, 1909
Accession Number:
10.125.24
On view at The Met Fifth Avenue in Gallery 774
Chests stored clothes, linens, table coverings, and other household items. The most richly ornamented joined chests produced in North America during the seventeenth century are those attributed to the Ipswich joiners, William Searle (d. 1667) and Thomas Dennis (1638–1706). Both acquired their florid style as apprentices in County Devon, England. Characteristics of the Searle-Dennis school on this chest include S-scrolls on the stiles and lower rail, interlocking lunettes on the top rail, and low-relief carving on the front panels.
H. Eugene Bolles, Boston, until 1909; [Mrs. Russell Sage, New York, 1909]
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