Art/ Collection/ Art Object
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Decanter

Maker:
Bakewell, Page & Bakewell (1808–1882)
Date:
ca. 1826–35
Geography:
Made in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
Culture:
American
Medium:
Blown and cut glass; clay cameo
Dimensions:
H. 7 3/8 in. (18.7 cm)
Classification:
Glass
Credit Line:
Purchase, The Overbrook Foundation Gift, 1995
Accession Number:
1995.13
On view at The Met Fifth Avenue in Gallery 704
One of a pair (its mate is in the Philadelphia Museum of Art), this decanter features elaborate cut decoration. It is distinguished by a sulphide portrait of Benjamin Franklin on the front. A difficult technique developed in Europe, a high-fired ceramic material is embedded into a bubble of glass, which is then deflated so the image is surrounded by glass. Highly fashionable in France, sulphide portrait decoration was first produced in America by the Pittsburgh firm Bakewell, Page, and Bakewell in 1825 in an effort to compete with European glass manufacturers. The Museum has two glass tumblers with sulphide portraits embedded in their bases, one depicting George Washington (1984.152), the other Lafayette (1947.44).
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Compote

Artist: Bakewell, Page & Bakewell (1808–1882) Date: 1820–35 Medium: Blown and cut glass Accession: 2000.193 On view in:Gallery 704

Tumbler

Artist: Bakewell, Page & Bakewell (1808–1882) Date: ca. 1825–30 Medium: Blown, cut, and engraved glass; clay cameo Accession: 2001.94 On view in:Gallery 704

Punchbowl

Artist: Bakewell, Page & Bakewell (1808–1882) Date: 1810–20 Medium: Blown, molded, pressed, and engraved glass Accession: 2011.161 On view in:Gallery 704

Tumbler

Artist: Bakewell, Page & Bakewell (1808–1882) Date: 1825–30 Medium: Blown glass Accession: 1984.152 On view in:Gallery 774

Tumbler

Artist: Bakewell, Page & Bakewell (1808–1882) Date: 1825–30 Medium: Blown, cut, and engraved glass Accession: 1982.216 On view in:Gallery 704