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Met Museum Presents
Talks, Tours, and Conversations
Fall 2012

* For tickets, visit www.metmuseum.org/tickets or call 212-570-3949.
* Tickets are also available at the Great Hall Box Office, which is open Tuesday-Saturday 10-4:30 and Sunday noon-5:00.
* Tickets include admission to the Museum on day of performance.
* 30 & Under Rush:  $15 tickets for ticket buyers 30 years and younger, with proof of age, the day of the event (subject to availability). For more information, visit
www.metmuseum.org/tickets, call 212-570-3949, or visit the box office.

Tuesday, October 2, 2012, at 6:00 p.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Andy Warhol and Reality TV
with Andy Cohen, Vincent Fremont, and Deborah Kass

Andy Warhol once said, “I’m really jealous of everybody who’s got their own show on television.  I want a show of my own.”  Warhol eventually starred in several series, culminating in Andy Warhol’s Fifteen Minutes, which Warhol conceived for MTV in the 1980s.  A quarter of a century later, Warhol’s idea that “Cable TV is the ultimate America” has come true—reality television and the celebrities it has created have become dominant forces in popular culture.  TV host (Watch What Happens Live), producer (Real Housewives, Top Chef), and author Andy Cohen; filmmaker and close Warhol associate Vincent Fremont; and artist Deborah Kass (creator of The Warhol Project, an homage to Warhol’s portraiture) discuss this unexplored aspect of Warhol’s legacy.
This event is part of Warhol Today, a series of concerts, talks, and tours extending Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years, an exhibition exploring Andy Warhol’s dominating influence not only in the visual realm but also in performance, media, and pop culture.  The exhibition is on view September 18—December 31, 2012.
The exhibition is made possible by Morgan Stanley.
Additional support is provided by the Gail and Parker Gilbert Fund and The Daniel and Estrellita Brodsky Foundation.
Concert and Lectures programs are made possible by Campbell Soup Company.
The exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.
Tickets: $25

Wednesday, October 3, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Fraternité: French Artists from Revolution to Romanticism
The Decline of Decadence—Rococo Art on the Eve of Revolution
Kathryn Calley Galitz, Associate Museum Educator
The Revolution of 1789 transformed French art.  Neoclassicism, embodied in the paintings of Jacques-Louis David, became the style of the day.  In this series of six lectures (Oct. 3, Oct. 10, Oct. 17, Oct. 24, Oct. 31, Nov. 7), Kathryn Calley Galitz explores the rise of Neoclassicism, culminating with its embrace by Emperor Napoleon.  The fall of the Empire in 1814 paved the way for the emerging Romantic aesthetic.
This series is supported by the Mrs. Donald Oenslager Fund.
Tickets:  $25 (Series:  $120)

Wednesday, October 3, 2012, at 6:00 p.m. in the Grace Rainey  Rogers Auditorium
Washington Crossing the Delaware: The Making of an Icon
Carrie Rebora Barratt, Metropolitan Museum Associate Director for Collections and Administration and American art scholar
Carrie Rebora Barratt hosts a four-part series of talks (Oct. 3, Oct. 10, Oct. 17, and Nov. 2) with Museum curators and conservators in the field about Washington Crossing the Delaware, the renowned Emanuel Leutze painting that is a centerpiece of the New American Wing Galleries for Paintings, Sculpture, and Decorative Arts.
In this series introduction, Carrie Rebora Barratt discusses the 1851 painting and its history at the Met.
This series is made possible by the Clara Lloyd-Smith Weber Fund.
Tickets:  $25 (Series:  $80)

Wednesday, October 10, 2012, at 6:00 p.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
The Conservation of Washington Crossing the Delaware
Michael Gallagher, Sherman Fairchild Conservator in Charge of the Department of Painting Conservation
Lance Mayer and Gay Myers, Conservators
Carrie Rebora Barratt, Metropolitan Museum Associate Director for Collections and Administration and American art scholar, hosts a four-part series of talks (Oct. 3, Oct. 10, Oct. 17, Nov. 2) with Museum curators and conservators in the field about Washington Crossing the Delaware, the renowned Emanuel Leutze painting that is a centerpiece of the New American Wing Galleries for Paintings, Sculpture, and Decorative Arts.
Michael Gallagher and conservators Lance Mayer and Gay Myers discuss the restoration of the painting.
This series is made possible by the Clara Lloyd-Smith Weber Fund.
Tickets:  $25 (Series:  $80)

Wednesday, October 10, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Fraternité: French Artists from Revolution to Romanticism
Revolution in Painting—Jacques-Louis David and the Neoclassical Ideal
Kathryn Calley Galitz, Associate Museum Educator
The Revolution of 1789 transformed French art.  Neoclassicism, embodied in the paintings of Jacques-Louis David, became the style of the day.  In this series of six lectures (Oct. 3, Oct. 10, Oct. 17, Oct. 24, Oct. 31, Nov. 7), Kathryn Calley Galitz explores the rise of Neoclassicism, culminating with its embrace by Emperor Napoleon.  The fall of the Empire in 1814 paved the way for the emerging Romantic aesthetic.
This series is supported by the Mrs. Donald Oenslager Fund.
Tickets:  $25 (Series:  $120)

Thursday, October 11, 2012, at 6:00 p.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Gian Lorenzo Bernini: Sketching in Clay and on Paper
Ian Wardropper, Director, The Frick Collection
The greatest Baroque sculptor, Gian Lorenzo Bernini, had a lasting impact on the city of Rome through vast projects at St. Peter’s church tomb complexes, fountains, and sculptures of angels that line a bridge across the Tiber River.  To create these life-size or colossal works, his fertile imagination first found expression in small clay models or sketches on paper.  In this lecture, Ian Wardropper, guest curator of the exhibition, discusses the design process, and what has been learned recently about Bernini’s modeling techniques.
This event is offered in conjunction with the exhibition Bernini: Sculpting in Clay, on view October 3, 2012—January 6, 2013.
The exhibition is made possible by the Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Foundation.
The exhibition was organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and the Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth.
Tickets:  $25
     
Wednesday, October 17, 2012, at 6:00 p.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Washington Crossing the Delaware: Art in the Service of Politics
H. Barbara Weinberg, Alice Pratt Brown Curator of American Paintings and Sculpture, American Wing
Carrie Rebora Barratt, Metropolitan Museum Associate Director for Collections and Administration and American art scholar, hosts a four-part series of talks (Oct. 3, Oct. 10, Oct. 17, Nov. 2) with Museum curators and conservators in the field about Washington Crossing the Delaware, the renowned Emanuel Leutze painting that is a centerpiece of the New American Wing Galleries for Paintings, Sculpture, and Decorative Arts.
Leutze’s representation of a critical episode in the American Revolution was associated with the campaigns for German unification about 1850 and was enlisted as an emblem of the Union cause during the Civil War.  In this lecture, H. Barbara Weinberg traces these and other roles it has played in relation to changing political contexts.  
This series is made possible by the Clara Lloyd-Smith Weber Fund.
Tickets:  $25 (Series:  $80)

Wednesday, October 17, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Fraternité: French Artists from Revolution to Romanticism
Rebels and Rivals in David’s Studio
Kathryn Calley Galitz, Associate Museum Educator
The Revolution of 1789 transformed French art.  Neoclassicism, embodied in the paintings of Jacques-Louis David, became the style of the day.  In this series of six lectures (Oct. 3, Oct. 10, Oct. 17, Oct. 24, Oct. 31, Nov. 7), Kathryn Calley Galitz explores the rise of Neoclassicism, culminating with its embrace by Emperor Napoleon.  The fall of the Empire in 1814 paved the way for the emerging Romantic aesthetic.
This series is supported by the Mrs. Donald Oenslager Fund.
Tickets:  $25 (Series:  $120)

Wednesday, October 17, 2012, at 2:30 p.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
The Cone Sisters of Baltimore
Marlene Barasch Strauss, Art Historian
The Cone sisters of Baltimore traveled the world together over the first half of the 20th century, following their shared passion for the art of their time. They were friends and patrons of Gertrude Stein, Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, and many others. Art historian Marlene Barasch Strauss talks about how, together, the Cone sisters built one of the world's preeminent collections of modern art.
Tickets:  $25

Wednesday, October 24, 2012, at 6:00 p.m. in the Bonnie J. Sacerdote Lecture Hall
Met Salon Series

Making Madame Freedom
with Paul Miller and Soyoung Lee

Madame Freedom, the first film made in Korea after the Korean War, inaugurated a style that defined Korean soap operas.  Using historical and contemporary images from Korean cinema, Paul Miller, aka DJ Spooky, and Soyoung Lee, Associate Curator in the Met’s Asian Art Department, explore graphic design, cultural hybridity, and the fluorescence that occurs when cultures collide.  (Madame Freedom October 26 screening/performance)
This event is part of The Met Reframed, a Metropolitan Museum artist residency that in the 2012-13 season features Paul D. Miller aka DJ Spooky.
The Met Reframed is made possible by Marianna Sackler.
Tickets:  $30 (includes refreshments)

Wednesday, October 24, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Fraternité: French Artists from Revolution to Romanticism
Égalité? Women as Artists and Patrons in an Age of Revolution
Kathryn Calley Galitz, Associate Museum Educator
The Revolution of 1789 transformed French art.  Neoclassicism, embodied in the paintings of Jacques-Louis David, became the style of the day.  In this series of six lectures (Oct. 3, Oct. 10, Oct. 17, Oct. 24, Oct. 31, Nov. 7), Kathryn Calley Galitz explores the rise of Neoclassicism, culminating with its embrace by Emperor Napoleon.  The fall of the Empire in 1814 paved the way for the emerging Romantic aesthetic.
This series is supported by the Mrs. Donald Oenslager Fund.
Tickets:  $25 (Series:  $120)

Thursday, October 25, 2012, at 6:00 p.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Great Artists Play Politics: Goya, Degas, and Picasso
Goya’s Powerful Political Imagery—Weak Leaders, Foreign Intervention, The Third of May, and The Disasters of War

Jerrilynn D. Dodds, Dean, Sarah Lawrence College
Some of the most powerful paintings of the past two centuries were created in direct response to contemporary political crises.  These works were animated by the urgency of the political dialogue of their times.  But the same artistic intensity that grew from a particular political climate of the past can make a painting transcend its historical moment.  In this three-part series (Oct. 25, Nov. 1, Nov. 15), Jerrilynn D. Dodds talks about how a masterwork can bear potent witness to its political dialogue centuries later, with uncanny connections to the politics of our own times.
This series is supported by the Mrs. Joseph H. King Fund.
Tickets:  $25 (Series:  $60)

Wednesday, October 31, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Fraternité: French Artists from Revolution to Romanticism
“Napoleon—Painting Power”

Kathryn Calley Galitz, Associate Museum Educator
The Revolution of 1789 transformed French art.  Neoclassicism, embodied in the paintings of Jacques-Louis David, became the style of the day.  In this series of six lectures (Oct. 3, Oct. 10, Oct. 17, Oct. 24, Oct. 31, Nov. 7), Kathryn Calley Galitz explores the rise of Neoclassicism, culminating with its embrace by Emperor Napoleon.  The fall of the Empire in 1814 paved the way for the emerging Romantic aesthetic.
This series is supported by the Mrs. Donald Oenslager Fund.
Tickets:  $25 (Series:  $120)

Thursday, November 1, 2012, at 6:00 p.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Great Artists Play Politics: Goya, Degas, and Picasso
The Dreyfus Affair: Zola, Degas, and Anti-Semitism in French Political Life

Jerrilynn  D. Dodds, Dean, Sarah Lawrence College
Some of the most powerful paintings of the past two centuries were created in direct response to contemporary political crises.  These works were animated by the urgency of the political dialogue of their times.  But the same artistic intensity that grew from a particular political climate of the past can make a painting transcend its historical moment.  In this three-part series (Oct. 25, Nov. 1, Nov. 15), Jerrilynn D. Dodds talks about how a masterwork can bear potent witness to its political dialogue centuries later, with uncanny connections to the politics of our own times.
This series is supported by the Mrs. Joseph H. King Fund.
Tickets:  $25 (Series:  $60)

Friday, November 2, 2012, at 6:00 p.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Iterations of Washington Crossing the Delaware
Ian Alteveer, Assistant Curator, Department of Modern and Contemporary Art
Elizabeth Mankin Kornhauser, Curator, American Wing
Carrie Rebora Barratt, Metropolitan Museum Associate Director for Collections and Administration and American art scholar, hosts a four-part series of talks (Oct. 3, Oct. 10, Oct. 17, Nov. 2) with Museum curators and conservators about Washington Crossing the Delaware, the renowned Emanuel Leutze painting that is a centerpiece of the New American Wing Galleries for Paintings, Sculpture, and Decorative Arts.
Ian Alteveer and Elizabeth Mankin Kornhauser illustrate the artistic and popular responses to the painting:  appropriations of imagery from Larry Rivers in 1953 to Homer Simpson as Washington.
This series is made possible by the Clara Lloyd-Smith Weber Fund.
Tickets:  $25 (Series: $80)

Wednesday, November 7, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Fraternité: French Artists from Revolution to Romanticism
Girodet, Delacroix, and the Stirrings of Romanticism
Kathryn Calley Galitz, Associate Museum Educator
The Revolution of 1789 transformed French art.  Neoclassicism, embodied in the paintings of Jacques-Louis David, became the style of the day.  In this series of six lectures (Oct. 3, Oct. 10, Oct. 17, Oct. 24, Oct. 31, Nov. 7), Kathryn Calley Galitz explores the rise of Neoclassicism, culminating with its embrace by Emperor Napoleon.  The fall of the Empire in 1814 paved the way for the emerging Romantic aesthetic.
This series is supported by the Mrs. Donald Oenslager Fund.
Tickets:  $25 (Series:  $120)

Wednesday, November 7, 2012, at 6:00 p.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
A New Arab World? A Conversation with Fareed Zakaria
New galleries at the Met offer an epic view of 14 centuries of the art and culture of the Islamic world.  Writer and journalist Fareed Zakaria utilizes his deep experience with the region to create a context for the cultural and historical narratives explored in the new galleries.  Following his talk, Mr. Zakaria will engage in a conversation with Navina Najat Haidar, Curator in the Metropolitan Museum’s Department of Islamic Art.
Fareed Zakaria is host of CNN’s flagship International Affairs program, Editor at Large of TIME, a Washington Post columnist, and a New York Times bestselling author.
This event is presented in celebration of the first anniversary of the opening of the New Galleries for the Art of the Arab Lands, Turkey, Iran, Central Asia, and Later South Asia.
Tickets:  $25

Thursday, November 8, 2012, at 6:00 p.m. in the Bonnie J. Sacerdote Lecture Hall
Met Salon Series

Sex, Death, and Salvation: Iconography and Symbolism of the “Aiming Crossbowman”
Dirk Breiding, Assistant Curator, Arms and Armor
A powerful weapon aimed straight at you is an image employed by the visual arts for almost six centuries.  Today, it is still considered so powerful that there are certain industry regulations banning its commercial use.  This lecture by Dirk Breiding traces the history and changing symbolism of this fascinating subject, from late medieval drawings, paintings, and prints to modern and contemporary photography and film.
Tickets:  $27 (includes refreshments)

Friday, November 9, 2012, at 6:00 p.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Beginnings
Walker Evans, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Helen Levitt
Jeff L. Rosenheim, Curator in Charge, Department of Photographs
In the world of art, certain names conjure up iconic images, and major works have instant recognition.  This series of two lectures (Nov. 9, Nov. 16) by Jeff L. Rosenheim examines the first photographs by six modern masters of the medium: how did the artists launch their careers, what did they do with the camera?  Might the seeds of their achievement be visible in their earliest work?
Tickets:  $25 (Series:  $40)

Thursday, November 15, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
The Legacy of David Roentgen
with Viscount Linley (Chairman, Christie’s, UK) and Charles Cator (Deputy Chairman, Christie’s International)

David Roentgen (1743–1807) was known throughout Europe for his inventive and ingenious mechanical furniture, which found favor in the courts of France and Russia through the patronage of Marie Antoinette and Catherine the Great respectively. He was also famed for pioneering a new method of marquetry, created to give the impression of pietra dura. To mark the occasion of an extensive exhibition of Roentgen’s work, Lord Linley will share personal insights into Roentgen’s influence on his own furniture designs and his enduring influence on furniture makers today, while Charles Cator examines the collectors' market for Roentgen from when he was first “rediscovered” in the 19th century to the status in which he is held today.
This event is presented in conjunction with the exhibition Extravagant Inventions: The Princely Furniture of the Roentgens on view at the Metropolitan Museum October 30, 2012—January 27, 2013.
The exhibition is made possible by the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation.
Tickets:  $25

Thursday, November 15, 2012, at 6:00 p.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Great Artists Play Politics: Goya, Degas, and Picasso

Politics of the Spanish Civil War from Picasso’s Guernica to Capa’s Falling Soldier
Jerrilynn D. Dodds, Dean, Sarah Lawrence College
Some of the most powerful paintings of the past two centuries were created in direct response to contemporary political crises.  These works were animated by the urgency of the political dialogue of their times.  But the same artistic intensity that grew from a particular political climate of the past can make a painting transcend its historical moment.  In this three-part series (Oct. 25, Nov. 1, Nov. 15), Jerrilynn D. Dodds talks about how a masterwork can bear potent witness to its political dialogue centuries later, with uncanny connections to the politics of our own times.
This series is supported by the Mrs. Joseph H. King Fund.
Tickets:  $25 (Series:  $60)

Friday, November 16, 2012, at 6:00 p.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Beginnings
Diane Arbus, Lee Friedlander, William Eggleston
Jeff L. Rosenheim, Curator in Charge, Department of Photographs
In the world of art, certain names conjure up iconic images, and major works have instant recognition.  This series of two lectures (Nov. 9, Nov. 16) by Jeff L. Rosenheim examines the first photographs by six modern masters of the medium: how did the artists launch their careers?  What did they do with the camera?  Might the seeds of their achievement be visible in their earliest work?
Tickets:  $25 (Series:  $40)

Monday, November 26, 2012, at 11:00 a.m.
Gallery Tour of the American Paintings Galleries
with Bill T. Jones and Elizabeth Mankin Kornhauser

Tony Award-winning director and choreographer Bill T. Jones and Elizabeth Mankin Kornhauser, Curator in the American Wing, trace the expanding definitions of American art and the Museum’s roots as an institution founded in the aftermath of the American Civil War, through works of art in the Museum’s new American paintings galleries.
Luncheon with Mr. Jones and the curator follows the tour.
Tickets:  $350 (Limited Availability)

Tuesday, November 27, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
George Bellows, Master Realist
Bellows and New York

H. Barbara Weinberg, Alice Pratt Brown Curator, Department of American Paintings and Sculpture
By the time George Bellows died at age 42, he was deemed one of the greatest artists America had yet produced.  Between 1905 and 1925, he enlisted a vigorous realist style to portray New York City’s sites and characters; Maine’s rugged coast; the atrocities of World War I; friends and family; and other distinctive subjects.  Bellows’ paintings, drawings, and prints are intensely American and yet linked to European works that he studied at home in America—at the Metropolitan Museum, for example—rather than by going abroad.  These two lectures (Nov. 27, Dec 4) by H. Barbara Weinberg explore Bellows’s accomplishments in the context of his time and in relation to those of his contemporaries.
This series is made possible by the Clara Lloyd-Smith Weber Fund.
This lecture is offered in conjunction with the exhibition George Bellows, on view November 14, 2012—February 18, 2013.
The exhibition is made possible by The Peter Jay Sharp Foundation.
The exhibition was organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, in association with The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and the Royal Academy of Arts, London.
Tickets:  $25 (Series:  $40)

Thursday, November 29, 2012, at 6:00 p.m., in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
A Conversation with Tan Dun: A New Peony Pavilion in an Old Context
World-renowned composer Tan Dun will discuss his vision for restaging the classic Kunqu opera The Peony Pavilion in the Metropolitan’s Astor Court Chinese Scholar Garden.  Joining him for an onstage conversation on the eve of the first of the Peony Pavilion performances will be Maxwell K. Hearn, the Met’s Douglas Dillon Curator in Charge of Asian Art, who organized the complementary exhibition Chinese Gardens: Pavilions, Studios, Retreats, on view August 18, 2012— January 6, 2013).
This program is made possible by the C.F. Roe Slade Foundation.
Tickets:  $25

Thursday, November 29, 2012, at 6:00 p.m.
Gallery Tour of Regarding Warhol:  Sixty Artists, Fifty Years
with Miguel Gutierrez and Ian Alteveer
The work of choreographer and dancer Miguel Gutierrez, like Andy Warhol’s, “tackle(s) subject matter simultaneously personal and political, cerebral and emotional” (Los Angeles Times).  Gutierrez will offer his personal reflections on the Regarding Warhol exhibition on a tour he will lead with Ian Alteveer, Assistant Curator in the Metropolitan Museum’s Department of Modern and Contemporary Art. 
Miguel Gutierrez creates solo and group pieces with a variety of artists under the name Miguel Gutierrez and the Powerful People.  The New York premiere of Gutierrez’s And lose the name of action is part of the Brooklyn Academy of Music’s Next Wave Festival 2012.  www.miguelgutierrez.org
Cocktails with Mr. Gutierrez and Mr. Alteveer follow the tour.
This event is part of Warhol Today, a series of concerts, talks, and tours extending Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years, an exhibition exploring Andy Warhol’s dominating influence not only in the visual realm but also in performance, media, and pop culture.  The exhibition is on view September 18—December 31, 2012.  
The exhibition is made possible by Morgan Stanley.
Additional support is provided by the Gail and Parker Gilbert Fund and The Daniel and Estrellita Brodsky Foundation.
Concert and Lectures programs are made possible by Campbell Soup Company.
The exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.
Tickets:  $200 (Limited Availability)

Monday, December 3, 2012, at 11:00 a.m.
Dialogues with Warhol
Gallery Tour of Regarding Warhol:  Sixty Artists, Fifty Years with Marla Prather

Although it has often been claimed that Warhol is the most influential artist of the last half-century, no exhibition has truly examined that assertion in depth.  Marla Prather, Curator in the Met’s Department of Modern and Contemporary Art, leads a tour of the exhibition Regarding Warhol, which she co-curated.  
Luncheon with Ms. Prather follows the tour.
This event is part of Warhol Today, a series of concerts, talks, and tours extending Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years, an exhibition exploring Andy Warhol’s dominating influence not only in the visual realm but also in performance, media, and pop culture.  The exhibition is on view September 18—December 31, 2012.  
The exhibition is made possible by Morgan Stanley.
Additional support is provided by the Gail and Parker Gilbert Fund and The Daniel and Estrellita Brodsky Foundation.
Concert and Lectures programs are made possible by Campbell Soup Company.
The exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.
Tickets: $350 (Limited Availability)

Tuesday, December 4, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
George Bellows, Master Realist
Bellows Beyond the City

H. Barbara Weinberg, Alice Pratt Brown Curator, Department of American Paintings and Sculpture
By the time George Bellows died at age 42, he was deemed one of the greatest artists America had yet produced.  Between 1905 and 1925, he enlisted a vigorous realist style to portray New York City’s sites and characters; Maine’s rugged coast; the atrocities of World War I; friends and family; and other distinctive subjects.  Bellows’ paintings, drawings, and prints are intensely American and yet linked to European works that he studied at home in America—at the Metropolitan Museum, for example—rather than by going abroad.  These two lectures (Nov. 27, Dec 4) by H. Barbara Weinberg, Alice Pratt Brown Curator explore Bellows’s accomplishments in the context of his time and in relation to those of his contemporaries.
This series is made possible by the Clara Lloyd-Smith Weber Fund.
This lecture is offered in conjunction with the exhibition George Bellows, on view November 14, 2012-February 18, 2013.
The exhibition is made possible by The Peter Jay Sharp Foundation.
The exhibition was organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, in association with The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and the Royal Academy of Arts, London.
Tickets:  $25 (Series:  $40)

Wednesday, December 5, 2012, at 6:00 p.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
The Ash Can Artist’s New York: Times Square & Coney Island
Barry Lewis, Architectural Historian
If George Bellows and his colleagues wanted to paint “le tout New York” he had fertile ground in the new New York of a century ago.  Times Square in the “city,” and Coney Island on the ocean shores of Brooklyn, were emerging in the 1900s to serve this new world capital that, unlike the old ones, catered to everyone.  A society for the masses was being created, and New York’s two emerging entertainment districts of the early 20th century saw carpenters and their families mingling with accountants and with perhaps a Rockefeller or two thrown into the mix.  This lecture by architectural historian Barry Lewis will look at the architectural frameworks that New York created where the new mass society could have fun, and where Ash Can sensibilities—whether Bellows’s or Weegee’s—had plenty of material as subjects for their art.
This lecture is offered in conjunction with the exhibition George Bellows, on view November 14, 2012-February 18, 2013.
The exhibition is made possible by The Peter Jay Sharp Foundation.
The exhibition was organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, in association with The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and the Royal Academy of Arts, London.
Tickets:  $25

Monday, December 10, 2012, at 11:00 a.m.
Gods, Myths, and Elephants
Gallery Tour of the Indian and Cambodian Galleries with Olivier Bernier

In the course of its long history, India has produced many masterpieces.  The gods and goddesses, the heroes of the Ramayana and the Mahabharata, and, not least, elephants, have been the subjects of sculptors of genius, as has the Buddha.  Then, in the 6th century, as Hinduism and its culture spread to Cambodia, the Khmer artists went on to add their own brilliant style to the legacy of India.  As author Olivier Bernier tours the Indian and Khmer galleries, he will discuss not only the works of art, but also the life of one of the world’s great civilizations.
Luncheon with Mr. Bernier follows the tour.
Tickets:  $350 (Limited Availability)

Monday, December 17, 2012, at 11:00 a.m.
Italian Medieval Sculpture: Materials and Techniques
Private Gallery Tour with Jack Soultanian

Technological advances of the last decades have made it possible to determine more precisely the materials and techniques from which Italian medieval sculptures were made, the history of their alterations, and the mechanisms of their deterioration.  This tour led by Jack Soultanian, Conservator in the Met’s Department of Objects Conservation, provides a fuller understanding of the renowned Italian medieval sculpture of The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Luncheon with Mr. Soultanian follows the tour.
Tickets:  $350 (Limited Availability)

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September 27, 2012

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