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Met Museum Presents – October 2012

Performances & Talks Include:
* Madame Freedom – An Original Score by DJ Spooky Performed to the Iconic Korean Film
* Dean & Britta’s “13 Most Beautiful…Songs for Andy Warhol’s Screen Tests”
* “Andy Warhol and Reality TV” – A Talk with Andy Cohen, Vincent Fremont, and Deborah Kass
* “Washington Crossing the Delaware” – A Series of Four Talks by Met Curators and Conservators
* “Fraternité: French Artists from Revolution to Romanticism”—A Six-Part Series


Performances

Saturday, October 6, 2012, at 7:00 p.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
“13 Most Beautiful...Songs for Andy Warhol’s Screen Tests”
Featuring Dean and Britta

Dean Wareham and Britta Phillips (formerly of the band Luna), who perform as the duo Dean and Britta, present a multimedia event featuring a selection of Andy Warhol’s “Screen Test” films with a haunting original soundscape. As 13 of Warhol’s four-minute “Screen Test” film portraits are shown, an onstage four-member ensemble performs the score.
This event is part of Warhol Today, a series of concerts, talks, and tours extending Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years, an exhibition exploring Andy Warhol’s dominating influence not only in the visual realm but also in performance, media, and pop culture. The exhibition is on view September 18—December 31, 2012.
The exhibition is made possible by Morgan Stanley.
Additional support is provided by the Gail and Parker Gilbert Fund and The Daniel and Estrellita Brodsky Foundation.
Concert and Lectures programs are made possible by Campbell Soup Company.
The exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.
“13 Most Beautiful...Songs for Andy Warhol’s Screen Tests” was jointly commissioned by the Andy Warhol Museum and Pittsburgh Cultural Trust for the Pittsburgh International Festival of Firsts 2008.
Dean & Britta in 2010 released a double CD of the songs written for "13 Most Beautiful..." on their own label, Double Feature Records; a DVD of the show was released on DVD by Plexifilm in 2009. Dean Wareham and Britta Phillips are former members of the band Luna. Started by Wareham in 1992, Luna made seven studio albums. Tell Me Do You Miss Me is the film documentary about the band's final tour in 2005. Prior to creating Luna, Dean fronted the band Galaxie 500, and before joining Luna in 2000, Britta Phillips played in several bands, starred in the movie Satisfaction (with Julia Roberts, Justine Bateman, Liam Neeson, and Steve Cropper), and was the singing voice of the 1980s cartoon character JEM.
In 2003 Dean and Britta released L'Avventura, an album of covers and duets produced by Tony Visconti (Bowie, T. Rex). Their second album, Back Numbers, also produced by Visconti, was released on Zoe/Rounder Records in 2007. Dean & Britta have scored several films, most notably Noah Baumbach's The Squid & the Whalewww.deanandbritta.com
Tickets: $35

Friday, October 26, 2012, at 7:00 p.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Madame Freedom – Film screening with live performance of an original score
In 2007, Paul D. Miller, aka DJ Spooky, was commissioned by Art Center Nabi in Seoul, Korea, and the Korean American Film Festival in New York to re-score this classic 1956 film.  As he explains, “In the 1950s, Korea went through a drastic modernization process. After the Korean War ended, South Korea was firmly embedded in a Western cultural sphere, families were put into radically unexpected contexts, and the rise of independent women changed the face of society. The film was viewed as a metaphor of the harmful westernization of all traditions in postwar Korea....”
Miller’s score for string quartet evokes jazz nightclubs of the 21st century, and his use of electronic music enhances the dynamic tensions in the story and foregrounds the visual rhythm of the film’s editing. www.djspooky.com/art/film_madame_freedom.php
In a related event on October 24, 2012, at 6:00 p.m., Miller will talk with Soyoung Lee, Associate Curator in the Met’s Asian Art Department, about his score for the film (see below). 
This event is part of The Met Reframed: DJ Spooky in Residence, a Metropolitan Museum artist residency that in the 2012-13 season features Paul D. Miller aka DJ Spooky.
The Met Reframed is made possible by Marianna Sackler.
Tickets: $30

Talks

Tuesday, October 2, 2012, at 6:00 p.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Andy Warhol and Reality TV
with Andy Cohen, Vincent Fremont, and Deborah Kass

Andy Warhol once said, “I’m really jealous of everybody who’s got their own show on television. I want a show of my own.” Warhol eventually starred in several series, culminating in Andy Warhol’s Fifteen Minutes, which Warhol conceived for MTV in the 1980s. A quarter of a century later, Warhol’s idea that “Cable TV is the ultimate America” has come true—reality television and the celebrities it has created have become dominant forces in popular culture. TV host (Watch What Happens Live), producer (Real Housewives, Top Chef), and author Andy Cohen; filmmaker and close Warhol associate Vincent Fremont; and artist Deborah Kass (creator of The Warhol Project, an homage to Warhol’s portraiture) discuss this unexplored aspect of Warhol’s legacy.
This event is part of Warhol Today, a series of concerts, talks, and tours extending Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years, an exhibition exploring Andy Warhol’s dominating influence not only in the visual realm but also in performance, media, and pop culture. The exhibition is on view September 18—December 31, 2012.
The exhibition is made possible by Morgan Stanley.
Additional support is provided by the Gail and Parker Gilbert Fund and The Daniel and Estrellita Brodsky Foundation.
Concert and Lectures programs are made possible by Campbell Soup Company.
The exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and
the Humanities.
Tickets: $25

Wednesday, October 3, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Fraternité: French Artists from Revolution to Romanticism
The Decline of Decadence—Rococo Art on the Eve of Revolution

Kathryn Calley Galitz, Associate Museum Educator
The Revolution of 1789 transformed French art. Neoclassicism, embodied in the paintings of Jacques-Louis David, became the style of the day. In this series of six lectures (Oct. 3, Oct. 10, Oct. 17, Oct. 24, Oct. 31, Nov. 7), Kathryn Calley Galitz explores the rise of Neoclassicism, culminating with its embrace by Emperor Napoleon. The fall of the Empire in 1814 paved the way for the emerging Romantic aesthetic.
This series is supported by the Mrs. Donald Oenslager Fund.
Tickets: $25 (Series: $120)

Wednesday, October 3, 2012, at 6:00 p.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Washington Crossing the Delaware: The Making of an Icon
Carrie Rebora Barratt, Metropolitan Museum Associate Director for Collections and Administration and American art scholar
Carrie Rebora Barratt hosts a four-part series of talks (Oct. 3, Oct. 10, Oct. 17, and Nov. 2) with Museum curators and conservators in the field about Washington Crossing the Delaware, the renowned Emanuel Leutze painting that is a centerpiece of the New American Wing Galleries for Paintings, Sculpture, and Decorative Arts.
In this kick-off conversation, Ms. Barratt discusses the 1851 painting and its colorful history.
This series is made possible by the Clara Lloyd-Smith Weber Fund.
Tickets: $25 (Series: $80)

Wednesday, October 10, 2012, at 6:00 p.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
The Conservation of Washington Crossing the Delaware
Michael Gallagher, Sherman Fairchild Conservator in Charge of the Department of Painting Conservation
Lance Mayer and Gay Myers, Conservators

Carrie Rebora Barratt, Metropolitan Museum Associate Director for Collections and Administration and American art scholar, hosts a four-part series of talks (Oct. 3, Oct. 10, Oct. 17, Nov. 2) with Museum curators and conservators in the field about Washington Crossing the Delaware, the renowned Emanuel Leutze painting that is a centerpiece of the New American Wing Galleries for Paintings, Sculpture, and Decorative Arts.
Michael Gallagher and conservators Lance Mayer and Gay Myers discuss the restoration of the painting.
This series is made possible by the Clara Lloyd-Smith Weber Fund.
Tickets: $25 (Series: $80)

Wednesday, October 10, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Fraternité: French Artists from Revolution to Romanticism
Revolution in Painting—Jacques-Louis David and the Neoclassical Ideal

Kathryn Calley Galitz, Associate Museum Educator
The Revolution of 1789 transformed French art. Neoclassicism, embodied in the paintings of Jacques-Louis David, became the style of the day. In this series of six lectures (Oct. 3, Oct. 10, Oct. 17, Oct. 24, Oct. 31, Nov. 7), Kathryn Calley Galitz explores the rise of Neoclassicism, culminating with its embrace by Emperor Napoleon. The fall of the Empire in 1814 paved the way for the emerging Romantic aesthetic.
This series is supported by the Mrs. Donald Oenslager Fund.
Tickets: $25 (Series: $120)

Thursday, October 11, 2012, at 6:00 p.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Gian Lorenzo Bernini: Sketching in Clay and on Paper
Ian Wardropper, Director, The Frick Collection
The greatest Baroque sculptor, Gian Lorenzo Bernini, had a lasting impact on the city of Rome through vast projects at St. Peter’s church tomb complexes, fountains, and sculptures of angels that line a bridge across the Tiber River. To create these life-size or colossal works, his fertile imagination first found expression in small clay models or sketches on paper. In this lecture, Ian Wardropper, guest curator of the exhibition, discusses the design process, and what has been learned recently about Bernini’s modeling techniques.
This event is offered in conjunction with the exhibition Bernini: Sculpting in Clay, on view October 3, 2012—January 6, 2013.
The exhibition is made possible by the Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Foundation.
The exhibition was organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and the Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth.
Tickets: $25

Wednesday, October 17, 2012, at 6:00 p.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Washington Crossing the Delaware: Art in the Service of Politics
H. Barbara Weinberg, Alice Pratt Brown Curator of American Paintings & Sculpture, American Wing
Carrie Rebora Barratt, Metropolitan Museum Associate Director for Collections and Administration and American art scholar, hosts a four-part series of talks (Oct. 3, Oct. 10, Oct. 17, Nov. 2) with Museum curators and conservators in the field about Washington Crossing the Delaware, the renowned Emanuel Leutze painting that is a centerpiece of the New American Wing Galleries for Paintings, Sculpture, and Decorative Arts.
In this third conversation, Ms. Barratt and H. Barbara Weinberg explore the various roles the painting played in diverse political contexts, from its creation, which was associated with the campaigns for German unification, to its enlistment as an emblem of the Union cause during the Civil War, to current era representation in the service of causes such as gay marriage.
This series is made possible by the Clara Lloyd-Smith Weber Fund.
Tickets: $25 (Series: $80)

Wednesday, October 17, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Fraternité: French Artists from Revolution to Romanticism
Rebels and Rivals in David’s Studio

Kathryn Calley Galitz, Associate Museum Educator
The Revolution of 1789 transformed French art. Neoclassicism, embodied in the paintings of Jacques-Louis David, became the style of the day. In this series of six lectures (Oct. 3, Oct. 10, Oct. 17, Oct. 24, Oct. 31, Nov. 7), Kathryn Calley Galitz explores the rise of Neoclassicism, culminating with its embrace by Emperor Napoleon. The fall of the Empire in 1814 paved the way for the emerging Romantic aesthetic.
This series is supported by the Mrs. Donald Oenslager Fund.
Tickets: $25 (Series: $120)

Wednesday, October 17, 2012, at 2:30 p.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
The Cone Sisters of Baltimore
Marlene Barasch Strauss, Art Historian
The Cone sisters of Baltimore traveled the world together over the first half of the 20th century, following their shared passion for the art of their time. They were friends and patrons of Gertrude Stein, Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, and many others. Art historian Marlene Barasch Strauss talks about how, together, the Cone sisters built one of the world's preeminent collections of modern art.
Tickets: $25

Wednesday, October 24, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Fraternité: French Artists from Revolution to Romanticism
Égalité? Women as Artists and Patrons in an Age of Revolution

Kathryn Calley Galitz, Associate Museum Educator
The Revolution of 1789 transformed French art. Neoclassicism, embodied in the paintings of Jacques-Louis David, became the style of the day. In this series of six lectures (Oct. 3, Oct. 10, Oct. 17, Oct. 24, Oct. 31, Nov. 7), Kathryn Calley Galitz explores the rise of Neoclassicism, culminating with its embrace by Emperor Napoleon. The fall of the Empire in 1814 paved the way for the emerging Romantic aesthetic.
This series is supported by the Mrs. Donald Oenslager Fund.
Tickets: $25 (Series: $120)

Wednesday, October 24, 2012, at 6:00 p.m. in the Bonnie J. Sacerdote Lecture Hall
Met Salon Series
Culture in Transition: Madame Freedom and Modern Korea
with Paul Miller and Soyoung Lee

Madame Freedom, the first film made in Korea after the Korean War, inaugurated a style that defined Korean soap operas. Using historical and contemporary images from Korean cinema, Paul Miller, aka DJ Spooky, and Soyoung Lee, Associate Curator in the Met’s Asian Art Department, explore graphic design, cultural hybridity, and the fluorescence that occurs when cultures collide. (Madame Freedom October 26 screening/performance, see above)
This event is part of The Met Reframed: DJ Spooky in Residence, a Metropolitan Museum artist residency that in the 2012-13 season features Paul D. Miller aka DJ Spooky.
The Met Reframed is made possible by Marianna Sackler.
Tickets: $30 (includes refreshments)

Thursday, October 25, 2012, at 6:00 p.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Great Artists Play Politics: Goya, Degas, and Picasso
Goya’s Powerful Political Imagery—Weak Leaders, Foreign Intervention, The Third of May, and The Disasters of War

Jerrilynn D. Dodds, Dean, Sarah Lawrence College
Some of the most powerful paintings of the past two centuries were created in direct response to contemporary political crises. These works were animated by the urgency of the political dialogue of their times. But the same artistic intensity that grew from a particular political climate of the past can make a painting transcend its historical moment. In this three-part series (Oct. 25, Nov. 1, Nov. 15), Jerrilynn D. Dodds talks about how a masterwork can bear potent witness to its political dialogue centuries later, with uncanny connections to the politics of our own times.
This series is supported by the Mrs. Joseph H. King Fund.
Tickets: $25 (Series: $60)

Wednesday, October 31, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Fraternité: French Artists from Revolution to Romanticism
“Napoleon—Painting Power”

Kathryn Calley Galitz, Associate Museum Educator
The Revolution of 1789 transformed French art. Neoclassicism, embodied in the paintings of Jacques-Louis David, became the style of the day. In this series of six lectures (Oct. 3, Oct. 10, Oct. 17, Oct. 24, Oct. 31, Nov. 7), Kathryn Calley Galitz explores the rise of Neoclassicism, culminating with its embrace by Emperor Napoleon. The fall of the Empire in 1814 paved the way for the emerging Romantic aesthetic.
This series is supported by the Mrs. Donald Oenslager Fund.
Tickets: $25 (Series: $120)

* For tickets, visit www.metmuseum.org/tickets or call 212-570-3949.
* Tickets are also available at the Great Hall Box Office, which is open Tuesday-Saturday 10-4:30 and Sunday noon-5:00.
* Tickets include admission to the Museum on day of performance.
* 30 & Under Rush: $15 tickets for ticket buyers 30 years and younger, with proof of age, the day of the event (subject to availability). For more information, visit www.metmuseum.org/tickets, call 212-570-3949, or visit the box office.
* Bring the Kids!: $1 tickets for children (ages 7-16) when accompanied by an adult with a full-price ticket (subject to availability). For more information, visit www.metmuseum.org/tickets, call 212-570-3949, or visit the box office.


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September 12, 2012

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