Quantcast

The Metropolitan Museum of Art LogoEmail

Type the CAPTCHA word:

Now at the Met

The Ashcan School, The Eight, and the New York Art World

Sylvia Yount, Lawrence A. Fleischman Curator in Charge, The American Wing

Posted: Tuesday, May 26, 2015

There's something new to see in gallery 772: a more expansive look at the work of the early-twentieth-century urban realists known as the Ashcan School. Robert Henri, William Glackens, George Luks, Everett Shinn, and John Sloan explored many dimensions of modern life in paintings, drawings, and prints, and now—for the first time in The American Wing—you can see their work across various media in one gallery.

Read More

Now at the Met

Hidden Secrets of Ancient Egyptian Technology

Anna Serotta, Independent Conservator; and Federico Carò, Associate Research Scientist, Department of Scientific Research

Posted: Friday, May 22, 2015

Archaeological objects and works of art in museum collections are not only treasured for their aesthetic qualities, but are also repositories of invaluable information, often concealed at a first sight, about the civilizations that created them. Among the many beautiful pieces in the collection of the Met's Department of Egyptian Art, it is interesting to note one modest stone fragment (fig.1), the scientific investigation of which has provided a clue that could solve a long-time debate among Egyptologists and historians of technologies: the use of high-performance abrasives.

Read More

Now at the Met

The Jabachs Are in the House!

Stephan Wolohojian, Curator, Department of European Paintings

Posted: Tuesday, May 19, 2015

At long last, after ten months of conservation work, Charles Le Brun's arresting portrait of Everhard Jabach and his family is now on view in the galleries.

Read More

Now at the Met

Me, My Selfie, and I: A Day at the Met with Telly Leung

Telly Leung, Guest Blogger

Posted: Friday, May 15, 2015

May is Asian-Pacific American Heritage month, and my dear friends at the Met have asked me to be one of the many performers taking part in their upcoming Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month Celebration on Friday, May 22.

Read More

Now at the Met

George Stubbs and the Art of the Thoroughbred

Carol Santoleri, Research Assistant, Department of European Paintings

Posted: Wednesday, May 13, 2015

The early patrons of British painter George Stubbs (1724–1806) were enthusiasts of the hunt or the racecourse who sought flattering portraits, not just pictures, of the thoroughbred horses they owned. One such portrait, Turf, with Jockey up, at Newmarket, is now on view in gallery 629 as part of the exhibition Paintings by George Stubbs from the Yale Center for British Art.

Read More

Now at the Met

Conserving the Saint Martin Series: Technical Analysis of Fifteenth-Century Embroideries

Giulia Chiostrini, Assistant Conservator, Department of Textile Conservation

Posted: Monday, May 11, 2015

Seven embroideries, six roundels, and one arch panel depicting scenes from the life of Saint Martin are now on view in the exhibition Scenes from the Life of St. Martin: Franco-Flemish Embroidery from the Met Collection. These fifteenth-century textiles were embroidered with dyed silk, silver, and gilt–silver metal threads on a linen plain weave underlaid with two layers of linen plain weave (fig. 1).

Read More

Now at the Met

The Conservation of the Jabach Portrait: Almost There!

Michael Gallagher, Sherman Fairchild Conservator in Charge, Department of Paintings Conservation

Posted: Monday, May 11, 2015

The second and final phase of the retouching of the Jabach portrait—which has been undergoing conservation since July 2014—is virtually finished. This step brings the losses that had previously only been underpainted up to a full match with the surrounding original. Also, areas where the paint layer has been abraded in the past can be corrected.

Read More

Now at the Met

Explore the World with Senses of Springtime: Celebrate India!

Mary Ann Bonet, Coordinator of Family, Teen, and Multigenerational Learning

Posted: Friday, May 8, 2015

One of the things I love most about the Met is that our diverse collection allows us to take a journey around the world without ever leaving the building. I am particularly excited about our next festival on May 17, Senses of Springtime: Celebrate India!, which will give visitors the opportunity to explore a part of the world that I have always wanted to visit—India and Southeast Asia.

Read More

Now at the Met

A Jewelry Designer's Tour of the Met

Debbie Kuo, Administrator, Department of Greek and Roman Art

Posted: Friday, May 8, 2015

The Met's collection is a world of inspiration for artists. As an administrator in the Department of Greek and Roman Art and a jewelry designer, I often stop in the galleries on my way to a meeting or sketch during my lunch break, and I am constantly looking to past centuries for new ideas.

Read More

Now at the Met

Crossing Cultures—Platon for China: Through the Looking Glass

Rachel High, Editorial Assistant, Editorial Department

Posted: Thursday, May 7, 2015

Best known for his compelling portraits of world leaders, Platon spent several months photographing couture garments from designers such as Christian Dior, Jean Paul Gaultier, Karl Lagerfeld, Alexander McQueen, and Yves Saint Laurent, as well as traditional Chinese costume and decorative art objects. I spoke with him about the book, his work, and the importance of artists as cultural mediators.

Read More

Now at the Met

Restoring Bhairava's Ear

Pascale Patris, Conservator, Department of Objects Conservation

Posted: Tuesday, May 5, 2015

In 2012, this imposing Bhairava's mask came to the Museum as a part of an important donation from The Zimmerman Family Collection, and it is now on display in the newly renovated gallery 252. The sixteenth-century gilt and polychrome copper mask of Bhairava from Nepal had a significant loss to its appearance—its right ear was missing, and its attribute, a large copper pendant earring for the left ear, had been used as a substitute.

Read More

Now at the Met

Discussing the Rise of French Art Deco with Author Jared Goss

Rachel High, Editorial Assistant, Editorial Department

Posted: Wednesday, April 29, 2015

In April 1925, the Paris Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes introduced French Art Deco to the public at large. Ninety years later, French Art Deco, one of the only books in English focused on this subject, provides a detailed account of this important movement, encapsulating the complex modern sensibilities of the early twentieth century through a selection of objects from the Met's impressive collection. I spoke with Jared Goss, author of the catalogue, about French Art Deco and the effects of the Industrial Revolution on artistic attitudes and production in twentieth-century France.

Read More

Now at the Met

Olmec Babies as Early Portraiture in the Americas

James Doyle, Assistant Curator, Department of the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas

Posted: Friday, April 17, 2015

One of the stars of gallery 358 and the recent exhibition The Nelson A. Rockefeller Vision: In Pursuit of the Best in the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas is a seated figure of a chubby baby in the Olmec style from Central Mexico (fig. 1). As the Rockefeller exhibit pointed out, this is among one of the most celebrated Olmec ceramic works known to scholars, and was even selected as the cover model for the Museum of Primitive Art's landmark show on Preclassic Mesoamerica in 1965.

Read More

Now at the Met

The "Cutting Edge" of Fashion: Designs for the Decoration of Arms and Armor on Paper

Sasha Rossman, Visiting Research Scholar, Department of Drawings and Prints; and Femke Speelberg, Associate Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints

Posted: Thursday, April 16, 2015

In his 1583 book The Anatomie of Abuses, the English moralist Phillip Stubbes criticized the growing trend for wearing arms as a stylish accessory, condemning upstart fops who sported "swoords, daggers and rapiers guilte and reguilte, burnished, and costly engraven, with all things els that any noble of honorable, or worshipfull man doth, or may weare so as one cannot easily be discerned from the other." Stubbes's main concern lay in the fact that men of all classes gave in to the whims of fashion and started wearing decorated arms daily as pieces of jewelry, giving way to vanity and pride and simultaneously blurring the lines of social standing.

Read More

Now at the Met

Spectrum Spotlight: Fatal Attraction

Christopher Gorman, Assistant Administrator, Marketing and External Relations; Chair, Spectrum

Posted: Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Douglas Eklund, curator in the Met's Department of Photographs, recently spoke with me about the special exhibition Fatal Attraction: Piotr Uklański Photographs, on view through August 16.​

Read More

Now at the Met

Asian Art Centennial: One Hundred Years of Tibetan Art at the Met

Kurt Behrendt, Associate Curator, Department of Asian Art

Posted: Tuesday, April 14, 2015

In 1915, the president of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Robert de Forest, turned his attention to Asia and acquired a large group of Nepalese and Tibetan gem-studded objects. Among them was this dazzling ornament for the forehead of a sculpture. It presents the four directional Buddhas in diamonds, rubies, sapphires, emeralds, as well as auspicious materials such as red coral and turquoise. At the center, the cosmic axis of the universe, is a vajra featuring a large diamond surrounded by lapis lazuli—a clear reference to Vajrayana Buddhism as the diamond path.

Read More

Now at the Met

The Jabach Portrait: Reflections on an Extraordinary Acquisition

Keith Christiansen, John Pope-Hennessy Chairman, Department of European Paintings

Posted: Tuesday, April 7, 2015

Michael Gallagher has been taking readers of this blog series step by step through his conservation work on the remarkable Jabach portrait. So I thought this might be the moment—in the few weeks remaining until its installation in the galleries—to reflect on how we came to acquire this extraordinary picture.

Read More

Now at the Met

Where the Vast Sky Meets the Flat Earth: Framing Plains Indians

Daniel Kershaw, Exhibition Design Manager, Design

Posted: Monday, March 30, 2015

When I began thinking about the installation plan for the exhibition Plains Indians: Artists of Earth and Sky almost two years ago, I started organizing the artworks and contemplating the layout of the scheduled gallery. The Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Exhibition Hall (gallery 999) is usually divided into rooms, or a sequence of manageable spaces, but somehow this seemed inappropriate for an exhibition focused on art devoted to, and deeply reflective of, its overwhelming natural environment. Almost none of the objects, with the exception of modern and contemporary works, needed to be mounted to a wall, so that left most of the walls of the Met's second-largest special exhibition gallery available.

Read More

Now at the Met

A New Web Series: The Artist Project

Thomas P. Campbell, Director and CEO

Posted: Wednesday, March 25, 2015

We have spoken a lot lately about The Met's interest in looking at contemporary art through the lens of our historical collection. We have just launched a new project that gives you a glimpse of just what we mean when we talk about that kind of connected view of contemporary art.

Read More

Now at the Met

Intern Spotlight: Ibrahim Mohamed Ali's Work in Photograph Conservation

Nora Kennedy, Sherman Fairchild Conservator, Department of Photograph Conservation

Posted: Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Ibrahim Mohamed Ali joined the Metropolitan Museum's paid summer intern program from his position as a conservator at the Grand Egyptian Museum via the George Washington University Museum Studies Program, where he is working toward his master's degree. With a background in the conservation and preservation of metal archaeological artifacts but with an immense passion for everything photographic, Ibrahim delved into all aspects of photograph conservation during his nine weeks at the Met this past summer.

Read More

Follow This Blog: Subscribe

About this Blog

Now at the Met offers in-depth articles and multimedia features about the Museum's current exhibitions, events, research, announcements, behind-the-scenes activities, and more.