Quantcast

The Metropolitan Museum of Art LogoEmail

Type the CAPTCHA word:

Now at the Met

The Plains Indians Exhibition: A Milestone for the Met

Judith Ostrowitz, Research Associate, Department of the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas

Posted: Monday, March 9, 2015

Today, The Plains Indians: Artists of Earth and Sky, a ground-breaking exhibition of Native American art, opens to the public at the Metropolitan Museum. Although indigenous art from North America has been presented at the Museum before, both in the permanent galleries in the Michael C. Rockefeller Wing and in smaller-scale temporary exhibitions, this project represents a certain milestone in the Museum's history. It focuses on a single region and includes more than 150 works of art that range from ancient stone sculptures made before European contact through painted buffalo hides and items of prestigious regalia to more recent works on paper, paintings, photographs, and a contemporary video installation piece. The scope of this exhibition is extremely ambitious, and I am delighted to have been a part of this project as the organizer for the venue here in New York.

Read More

Now at the Met

L'Estampe Originale: A Rare Print Portfolio Now Online

Britany Salsbury, Former Research Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints; and Lisa Conte, Assistant Conservator, Department of Paper Conservation

Posted: Friday, March 6, 2015

During its two-year print run, the print portfolio L'Estampe Originale (1893–95) brought together the most sophisticated developments in printmaking by a range of vanguard artists. The Met's unique, complete edition of the prints was recently digitized and is now available for consultation online.

Read More

Now at the Met

The Conservation of the Jabach Portrait: Starting the Retouching

Michael Gallagher, Sherman Fairchild Conservator in Charge, Department of Paintings Conservation

Posted: Wednesday, March 4, 2015

Michael Gallagher uses gouache paint to retouch losses in the Jabach portrait, which has been undergoing conservation for the past eight months.

With the exception of the inevitable damage caused by the turning over of the top of the canvas to attach it to a smaller stretcher (see my September 24, 2014, post about this aspect of the painting's history), the great Jabach family portrait is in exceptional condition. Nevertheless, there are several small losses and scrapes that are typical for a painting of this age and size and which hung in domestic interiors—albeit quite grand ones—for centuries. So the next step is to retouch these areas.

Read More

Now at the Met

The Gilded Road: A Journey in Tweets

James Doyle, Assistant Curator, Department of the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas

Posted: Monday, March 2, 2015

I recently embarked on a research trip that revealed new insights into the cultural contexts of some of the Met's most beloved objects made of gold, silver, and copper from Central and South America. The ancient artists that lived in present-day Panama, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru produced incredible metal masterpieces now found in national, public, and private collections around the world. Though the specific focus of my trip was to study metallurgical traditions, visits to archaeological sites and new museums held many surprises pertaining to the arts of architecture, textiles, pottery, and even woodworking. Throughout the trip, I documented our team's visits to each place on Twitter. Here is a summary of the three-week journey from Panama to Peru, illustrated with a selection of the photos I tweeted.

Read More

Now at the Met

Bloomberg Hosts Instameet at the Met

Christopher Gorman, Assistant Administrator, Marketing and External Relations; Chair, Spectrum

Posted: Friday, February 27, 2015

On Monday, February 2, I was thrilled to be a part of a Bloomberg Philanthropies–hosted "Instameet," an event bringing together people who use Instagram for a whirlwind session of picture-taking. I found myself among some wonderful Museum colleagues, staff from Bloomberg Philanthropies, and some of the most influential Instagramers in New York City.

Read More

Now at the Met

Destruction at the Mosul Museum

Thomas P. Campbell, Director and CEO

Posted: Thursday, February 26, 2015

Speaking with great sadness on behalf of the Metropolitan, a museum whose collection proudly protects and displays the arts of ancient and Islamic Mesopotamia, we strongly condemn this act of catastrophic destruction to one of the most important museums in the Middle East. The Mosul Museum's collection covers the entire range of civilization in the region, with outstanding sculptures from royal cities such as Nimrud, Nineveh, and Hatra in northern Iraq. This mindless attack on great art, on history, and on human understanding constitutes a tragic assault not only on the Mosul Museum, but on our universal commitment to use art to unite people and promote human understanding. Such wanton brutality must stop, before all vestiges of the ancient world are obliterated.

Now at the Met

Nine "Secrets" about the History of the Met's Department of Asian Art

Mike Hearn, Douglas Dillon Chairman of the Department of Asian Art

Posted: Friday, February 20, 2015

In preparing a history of the Museum's Department of Asian Art, which this year celebrates its centennial by showcasing its unparalleled collection through a range of exhibitions, gallery talks, and other offerings, I have uncovered a number of little-known facts and many "secrets" that are not widely known to the public. Here are nine of the most fascinating.

Read More

Now at the Met

The Met's Joint Mission to Malqata

Catharine H. Roehrig, Curator, Department of Egyptian Art

Posted: Tuesday, February 17, 2015

The remains of the festival city of Malqata are located on the west bank of the Nile, about 430 miles south of Cairo, opposite the modern city of Luxor (usually referred to by Egyptologists as Thebes). The festival city dates to the time of the pharaoh Amenhotep III, who reigned during the second half of Dynasty 18, during Egypt's New Kingdom. This pharaoh was the father of Akhenaten, and very likely the grandfather of Tutankhamun.

Read More

Now at the Met

The Mummy of Nesmin: A Closer Look

Isabel Stünkel, Associate Curator, Department of Egyptian Art; and Sarah Nankivell, 2014 Intern, Department of Egyptian Art and Digital Media Department

Posted: Tuesday, February 17, 2015

For several years The Metropolitan Museum of Art has been collaborating with the NYU Langone Medical Center Department of Radiology, using computed tomography (CT) to scan objects in the Museum's collection for research purposes.

Read More

Now at the Met

Guns, Paper, and Stains: Preserving History through Interdepartmental Collaboration

Angela Campbell, Assistant Conservator, Department of Paper Conservation

Posted: Friday, February 13, 2015

Included in the Arms and Armor: Notable Acquisitions 2003–2014 exhibition, curated by Donald J. La Rocca and currently on display in the galleries of the Department of Arms and Armor though December 6, are several printed designs associated with ornamental firearms. Upon acquisition, two of these prints—the decorative title page from the album Plvsievrs Pieces et Ornements Darquebuzerie, acquired in 2011, and a design for the stock of a musket from the Nouveavx Desseins D'Arquebvseries, acquired in 2013—appeared similarly stained and damaged, but underwent distinctly different conservation campaigns. The two prints, as well as all of the other works on paper currently on display, will be on view through March 2015, due to their preservation needs.

Read More

Follow This Blog: Subscribe

About this Blog

Now at the Met offers in-depth articles and multimedia features about the Museum's current exhibitions, events, research, announcements, behind-the-scenes activities, and more.