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Now at the Met

Spectrum Spotlight: Yaëlle Biro

Lucy Redoglia, Associate Online Community Producer, Digital Media; and Christopher Gorman, Assistant for Administration, Audience Development

Posted: Thursday, May 29, 2014

Brought to you by the Spectrum group, which encourages post-college audiences to experience the Met in new and unexpected ways, this post is the third installment of our "Spectrum Spotlight" series, which introduces some of the staff members who make the Museum such a special place.

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Living on the Edge: Tapestry Borders

Sarah Mallory, Research Assistant, European Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Posted: Tuesday, May 27, 2014

In the world of tapestry, it's hip to be square—or rectangular, for that matter. Why, you ask? The answer is quite simple: borders.

You might have noticed that a decorative, tapestry-woven strip traces the edges of many tapestries, which is referred to as the border. While the border is very much a part of the physical tapestry itself, it often has a personality all its own. And, while some border designs were reused on multiple sets of unrelated tapestries, these ornamental edges can still be thought of as something like a thumbprint, a distinguishing characteristic that is apparent only upon close inspection.

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Charles James: Beyond Fashion—Interview with Photographer Karin L. Willis

Rachel High, Editorial Assistant, Editorial Department

Posted: Tuesday, May 27, 2014

I recently sat down with Karin L. Willis, the photographer for the Charles James: Beyond Fashion catalogue that accompanies the current exhibition of James's work, on view through August 10. The publication offers a comprehensive study of the life and work of the legendary Anglo-American couturier Charles James (1906−1978), highlights his virtuosity and inventiveness, and includes early photographs and rarely seen archival items—including muslin study pieces, dress forms, and sketches. During our conversation Karin spoke about the challenging but rewarding process of photographing James's designs.

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Gloria—A Pig Tale Brings Farm Life to the Met

Meryl Cates, Press Officer, Met Museum Presents

Posted: Friday, May 23, 2014

The opera Gloria—A Pig Tale, which will run for three performances at the Met between May 29 and June 1, is a wicked twist on the classic fairy tale—featuring a heroine pig, an unlikely (and wild) knight in shining armor, and a prince with an ulterior motive.

The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium stage will be inventively converted into a farm where the story can unfold in true operatic style, with rich, multilayered sets, a vaudevillian and dynamic score composed by HK Gruber, and unforgettable costumes. Designed by Doug Fitch of Giants Are Small and presented as part of the inaugural NY PHIL BIENNIAL, Gloria will be brought to life with incredible detail in an unprecedented transformation of the Met's main stage.

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Memorial Day at the Met

Victoria Cairl, Tourism Marketing Manager

Posted: Friday, May 23, 2014

Join us throughout the holiday weekend as we celebrate Memorial Day at the Met. Enjoy a special guided tour of the American Wing, use one of our many family guides to explore the galleries, or see artworks in the Museum's collection that were saved by the Monuments Men—a group of unlikely heroes culled from the art world who risked their lives to preserve Europe's cultural treasures during World War II.

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Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month at the Met

Donna Williams, Chief Audience Development Officer

Posted: Friday, May 23, 2014

May is Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month, a celebration of Asians and Pacific Islanders in the United States. This month affords us the opportunity to reflect on the various achievements and traditions of so many of our neighbors, friends, and family members. The Metropolitan's permanent collection and current exhibitions offer a calm and reflective setting for appreciating the art from this part of the world.

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Find the Chinese Treasury—if You Dare

Denise Patry Leidy, Curator, Department of Asian Art

Posted: Wednesday, May 21, 2014

The Florence and Herbert Irving Galleries for Chinese Decorative Arts, located on the mezzanine at the north end of the Museum, are filled with extraordinary objects made in materials that include silk, lacquer, and jade. These galleries can only be reached by an elevator or a staircase from the Chinese painting galleries, however, so finding the artworks displayed there can be categorized as "extreme" museum-going: It takes true commitment.

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In the Footsteps of Saint Francis

Alexa Schwartz, Collections Management Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints

Posted: Monday, May 19, 2014

Published in Florence by Fra Lino Moroni in 1612, the Descrizione del Sacro Monte della Vernia (Description of the Sacred Mount Alverno) serves as a guide to Monte della Vernia (today known as La Verna) in the Tuscan Apennines. Monte della Vernia was the location where Saint Francis of Assisi retreated in 1224 for a forty-day period of fasting and meditation. It was there where he had the vision of an angel carrying the crucified Christ and experienced the stigmata.

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New MetPublications: Spring 2014

Mark Polizzotti, Publisher and Editor in Chief, Editorial Department

Posted: Monday, May 19, 2014

The Museum's Editorial Department has kept busy this spring, producing a range of new titles that celebrate the Met's collection and special exhibitions. The following are seven spectacular publications, just off the presses.

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Journeys to Divinity: A Preview

Kurt Behrendt, Assistant Curator, Department of Asian Art

Posted: Thursday, May 15, 2014

The upcoming Met Museum Presents talk Journeys to Divinity, along with the current exhibition Tibet and India: Buddhist Traditions and Transformations, touch on how imagery functions to convey complex social and religious meanings—a concept occurring today in a myriad of contexts, as the Internet penetrates deeper into our communal experience. Gonkar Gyatso considers just such media in his construction Dissected Buddha, which draws from fragments of pop culture, mass media, and advertising in a way that appeals to a broad audience and breaks down both language and geographic boundaries.

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Now at the Met offers in-depth articles and multimedia features about the Museum's current exhibitions, events, research, announcements, behind-the-scenes activities, and more.