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Now at the Met

Cruel Elegance in an Eight-Hundred-Year-Old Chinese Brocade

Pengliang Lu, Henry A. Kissinger Curatorial Fellow, Department of Asian Art

Posted: Wednesday, December 23, 2015

Reader beware: although elegant in appearance, the textile shown above depicts a moment of cruelty! This extraordinary Jin dynasty (1115–1234) silk brocade with a repeated pattern illustrating a swan hunt is now on view through June 19, 2016, alongside other important and unusual textiles in the exhibition Chinese Textiles: Ten Centuries of Masterpieces from the Met Collection.

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Creating Virtual and Physical Models of the Pyramid Complex of Senwosret III

Ronald E. Street, Senior Manager of 3D Image, Molding, and Prototyping, Merchandise and Retail Department; and Dieter Arnold, Curator, Department of Egyptian Art

Posted: Monday, December 21, 2015

In 1990, The Metropolitan Museum of Art began excavating and studying the pyramid complex of King Senwosret III at Dahshur, Egypt (figs. 2 and 3). Built around 1870 B.C., the huge complex sits near the edge of a desert plateau that now overlooks vast palm groves. The buildings were razed to the ground in the Ramesside Period (ca. 1295–1069 B.C.) and its stones were removed for reuse in new construction projects. Despite this destruction, the Met's archaeologists have been able to establish the likely appearance of the original monument by using the remaining foundations to determine the plan and dimensions of the complex. A large number of surviving architectural fragments enable the reconstruction of its enormous aboveground structures, while the reconstruction of its wall decoration from thousands of fragments suggests the proportions as well as some exterior features of the temples and chapels.

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Heritage in Peril

Thomas P. Campbell, Director and CEO

Posted: Wednesday, December 16, 2015

This past October, The Met hosted a conference in Istanbul with Columbia University and Koç University about the crucial issues around cultural heritage preservation in Syria and Iraq. The gathering allowed us to convene key participants from both countries who would not otherwise have been able to get a visa to attend such a meeting in the United States. These participants shared their firsthand accounts of the challenging situations under which they are currently working as they try to salvage the heritage of their countries.

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Now at the Met

Audible Visuals: J. Kenneth Moore on the Met's Musical Instruments

Rachel High, Publishing and Marketing Assistant, Editorial Department

Posted: Wednesday, December 16, 2015

Musical Instruments: Highlights of The Metropolitan Museum of Art presents over one hundred exemplary works from the Met's comprehensive collection of musical instruments, which spans thousands of years and cultures across the globe. I spoke with J. Kenneth Moore—Frederick P. Rose Curator in Charge of the Department of Musical Instruments and an author of this catalogue—about the instruments in the Met's collection, the connection between musical instruments and other works of art, and the stories behind these objects that are stunning both musically and visually.

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An Incredible Classroom: Peter Hristoff on Teaching at the Met

Peter Hristoff, Artist in Residence, Education Department and Department of Islamic Art

Posted: Monday, December 14, 2015

My residency at The Metropolitan Museum of Art has prompted me to make the opportunities and experiences I have over the year an integral part of both my studio and teaching practices—two elements of my life that I have continuously merged over the years. My goal is to make the interchange between these two elements as seamless as possible, and I have been determined to allow the Met residency to saturate my work and my teaching.

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A Very Special Visitor: Albrecht Dürer's Woodblock for The Fifth Knot

Femke Speelberg, Associate Curator in Ornament and Architectural Prints, Drawings, and Modelbooks, Department of Drawings and Prints

Posted: Friday, December 11, 2015

The current exhibition Fashion and Virtue: Textile Patterns and the Print Revolution, 1520–1620, on view through January 10, 2016, celebrates the first hundred years of the production of a new genre of popular booklets that distributed designs for textile decorations all over Europe. These textile pattern books were first printed in the 1520s, about twenty years after ornament and design had emerged as autonomous and very popular subjects in prints and books. This significant development is illustrated in the exhibition by a case study focused on a very special series of prints known as The Six Knots (figs. 1 and 2).

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What Artists See: The Artist Project, Season 4

Keith Christiansen, John Pope-Hennessy Chairman, Department of European Paintings

Posted: Tuesday, December 8, 2015


Have you tuned in to The Artist Project yet? If not, you really should. Now in its fourth season, each episode of this web series features a contemporary artist who chooses a work from the Met's collection and talks about why he or she finds it so important.

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Photographing the Gold Coast: The Lutterodt Studios

Erin Haney, Guest Blogger

Posted: Monday, December 7, 2015

Who were those Gold Coast men? Lamentably, we are often missing crucial information on photographs from the 1880s. Still, it's worth making some educated guesses about what is signified in Albert George Lutterodt and George A. G. Lutterodt's Five Men.

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The Upside-down Catfish

Isabel Stünkel, Associate Curator, Department of Egyptian Art

Posted: Monday, December 7, 2015

Who can resist a piece of exquisite jewelry thought to bear magical properties?

This wonderful fish pendant on loan from the National Museums Scotland is on view through January 24, 2016, in the exhibition Ancient Egypt Transformed: The Middle Kingdom. Exemplifying the high craftsmanship of jewelry makers during the Middle Kingdom (ca. 2030–1650 B.C.), this pendant also embodies the magic that was part of life for the ancient Egyptians, which they incorporated into a wide variety of objects.

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The Art of Display: Mounting Arms and Armor in The Royal Hunt

Sean Patrick Belair, Annette de la Renta Fellow, Department of Arms and Armor

Posted: Wednesday, December 2, 2015

The exhibition The Royal Hunt: Courtly Pursuits in Indian Art, on view through December 8, brings together Rajasthani and Mughal paintings from the collections of the Met's Department of Asian Art and Department of Islamic Art, as well as from private collections. These paintings, which depict the extravagance and pageantry of the hunting culture in the royal courts of India, are shown alongside a selection of Indian hunting weapons and accessories from the Department of Arms and Armor. Among the objects are painted matchlocks, an elephant goad, gunpowder flasks carved with fantastical creatures, weapons decorated with elephants and tigers, and other tools of the hunt.

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About this Blog

Now at the Met offers in-depth articles and multimedia features about the Museum's current exhibitions, events, research, announcements, behind-the-scenes activities, and more.