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Now at the Met

Event Highlights: February 5–7

Posted: Thursday, February 4, 2016

The Museum offers hundreds of events and programs each month—including lectures, performances, tours, family activities, and more. The following listings are just a sample of our upcoming programs.

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Van Eyck's The Crucifixion; The Last Judgment: Rethinking a Masterwork

Maryan Ainsworth, Curator, Department of European Paintings; and Keith Christiansen, John Pope-Hennessy Chairman, Department of European Paintings

Posted: Tuesday, February 2, 2016

The past as fixed in amber? Nothing more to learn about an artwork? Nonsense! Digging deeper into the history of a work of art depends on the questions one asks and the ways in which scholars use the investigatory tools at their disposal.

On January 25, the Department of European Paintings let everyone in on one of the most fascinating and unexpected reassessments I can think of, relating to one of the Met's most prestigious masterpieces: Jan van Eyck's "diptych" (but was it a diptych?) of the Crucifixion and Last Judgment, which is on view through April 24 in the exhibition A New Look at a Van Eyck Masterpiece.

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Wordplay at the Met: The Drawings of Matthias Buchinger

Freyda Spira, Associate Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints

Posted: Thursday, January 28, 2016

A longtime interest of renowned conjurer and collector Ricky Jay, Matthias Buchinger (1674–1739) was a master of calligraphy and micrography—a traditional art form dating to the late ninth century, in which minute lines of text are used to shape patterns or forms. However, what initially drew Jay to Buchinger was the latter's unparalleled legerdemain. As a magician of the sleight-of-hand variety himself, Jay was fascinated by Buchinger's range of unusual entertainments and his ability, despite having no hands, to grip and manipulate objects between his two appendages. The exhibition Wordplay: Matthias Buchinger's Drawings from the Collection of Ricky Jay, draws primarily from Ricky Jay's collection, and explores for the first time the work of the "Little Man of Nuremberg."

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Getting Ready for Valentin de Boulogne's Big Day

Keith Christiansen, John Pope-Hennessy Chairman, Department of European Paintings

Posted: Monday, January 25, 2016

On October 5, 2016, the Department of European Paintings will open a magnificent exhibition—the first ever to be devoted to Valentin de Boulogne (1591–1632), one of the most original followers of Caravaggio. A French painter active in Rome, Valentin was famous in his own day, and his unique voice continues to speak to us now. I first encountered his paintings in the Louvre in 1967, and I have been hooked ever since. This is an exhibition I have wanted to do for years.

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My Early Life with the Middle Kingdom

Dorothea Arnold, Curator Emerita, Department of Egyptian Art

Posted: Tuesday, January 19, 2016

I began my career as an archaeologist more than fifty years ago, in the vast ancient necropolis on the west bank of the Nile opposite modern-day Luxor. On behalf of the German Archaeological Institute, I worked with a team that excavated the big rock-cut tomb of the overseer of troops Intef, who served Mentuhotep II, the king who reunited Egypt and thus founded the Middle Kingdom (ca. 2030–1650 B.C.). We were lucky, because in the very first season we found a beautiful statue of the general and uncovered a painted battle scene.

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Tiles, Carpets, and Panels: A Few of Peter Hristoff's Favorite Things

Peter Hristoff, Artist in Residence, Education Department and Department of Islamic Art

Posted: Thursday, January 14, 2016

During my upcoming Artists on Artwork tour on January 29, I will engage in a conversation with visitors about works in the Museum's collection that I find particularly relevant to my practice. It's particularly fitting that the event will be held in Galleries for Art of the Arab Lands, Turkey, Iran, Central Asia, and Later South Asia, as a number of the works I will be highlighting are on display in those galleries. Here's a preview of some of the artworks I will discuss.

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Jewelry from the Haraga Treasure, United at the Met

Diana Craig Patch, Lila Acheson Wallace Curator in Charge, Department of Egyptian Art; and Kei Yamamoto, Lila Acheson Wallace Research Associate, Department of Egyptian Art

Posted: Monday, January 11, 2016

The unexpected occurred just over a year ago, when the archaeological community learned of a surprising group of objects being offered for sale. Called the "Haraga Treasure," these pieces had belonged to the St. Louis Society, a local chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America, for about one hundred years. The objects found their way to St. Louis, Missouri, as a result of a generous act the Egyptian government practiced during the first seventy years of the twentieth century.

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From the Archives: How Madame X Came to the Met

Stephanie L. Herdrich, Assistant Research Curator, The American Wing

Posted: Friday, January 8, 2016

One hundred years ago today, on January 8, 1916, John Singer Sargent (1856–1925) offered to sell his masterpiece Madame X to the Met. Writing from his home in London to his longtime friend and Met Director Edward "Ned" Robinson, Sargent explained, "my portrait of Mme. Gautreau is now . . . at the San Francisco exhibition, and now that it is in America I rather feel inclined to let it stay there if a Museum should want it. I suppose it is the best thing I have done. I would let the Metropolitan Museum have it for £1,000."

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New Acquisitions Added to Korea: 100 Years of Collecting at the Met

Soyoung Lee, Associate Curator, Department of Asian Art

Posted: Tuesday, January 5, 2016

Don't miss these must-see recent gifts to the Museum, all of which are now installed in the Arts of Korea gallery as part of the exhibition Korea: 100 Years of Collecting at the Met, on view through March 27, 2016.

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Reinforcing Sierra Leonean Identity: Alphonso Lisk-Carew

Julie Crooks, Guest Blogger

Posted: Wednesday, December 30, 2015

Alphonso Lisk-Carew was a Sierra Leonean photographer whose practice was firmly rooted in the histories of Sierra Leone. Lisk-Carew's career spanned over fifty years, and his photography threw into sharp relief Sierra Leone's myriad local personalities, cityscapes, cultural practices, and natural resources. Through his lens, Lisk-Carew witnessed the development of Sierra Leone under the colonial regime, and became one amongst many early Sierra Leonean photographers who had a hand in shaping the country's history.

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About this Blog

Now at the Met offers in-depth articles and multimedia features about the Museum's current exhibitions, events, research, announcements, behind-the-scenes activities, and more.