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Staff List

Christina Alphonso, Administrator, joined the staff of the Department of Medieval Art and The Cloisters in 2005. She oversees daily operations and activities, including those of the gardens, manages the operating budget, and acts as liaison with other Museum departments and the community. She also contributes to The Met Cloisters' blog, In Season. Christina graduated from Bryn Mawr College, earned her MA from Hunter College, and completed postgraduate coursework in art history at The City University of New York. Her area of interest is medieval textiles, particularly Italian figural silks.
Peter Barnet, Senior Curator, served as curator at the Detroit Institute of Arts, where he organized the exhibition Images in Ivory: Precious Objects of the Gothic Age (1998) and co-authored the accompanying catalogue and the Catalogue of Italian Sculpture in the Detroit Institute of Arts. He has supervised major gallery renovations and reinstallations at the Museum since 1998, including the exhibitions Lions, Dragons and Other Beasts: Aquamanilia of the Middle Ages, Vessels for Church and Table (2006) at the Bard Graduate Center, and Earth, Sea, and Sky: Nature in Western Art—Masterpieces from the Metropolitan Museum of Art (2012–13), which traveled to Tokyo and Beijing. He is currently working on a book about the medieval sculpture collection at The Met.

Selected Publications:

Barbara Drake Boehm, Paul and Jill Ruddock Senior Curator for The Met Cloisters, is co-curator of the exhibitions Jerusalem 1000–1400: Every People Under Heaven (2016), The Game of Kings (2011–12), Prague: The Crown of Bohemia (2005), and Enamels of Limoges (1996), and curator of Medieval Jewish Art in Context (2011–12). She recently contributed to the exhibitions L'Art du Jeu (2012–13) (Musée de Cluny, Paris) and Treasures of Heaven (2010–11) (Cleveland, Baltimore, London). A graduate of Wellesley College, Dr. Boehm directs the Curatorial Studies program administered with the Institute of Fine Arts, from which she received her PhD.

Selected Publications:

Christine Brennan, Senior Research Associate, joined the Museum's staff in 1992. She is responsible for collections management initiatives in the Department of Medieval Art and The Cloisters. She works with the curatorial staff on projects associated with acquisitions, the permanent collection, special exhibitions, and publications, and is the coordinator for incoming and outgoing loans. She's also a specialist in the history of collecting medieval art from 19th- and 20th-century Europe and America. Her dissertation, currently in progress at the Bard Graduate Center, focuses on the Brummer Gallery. She has a BA from Union College, an MA in history and a certificate in museum studies from New York University, and an MA and MPhil from the Bard Graduate Center.

Selected Publications:

  • Brennan, Christine E. "Hoentschel's Gothic Importance." In Salvaging the Past: Georges Hoentschel and French Decorative Arts from The Metropolitan Museum of Art, edited by Daniëlle O. Kisluk-Grosheide, Deborah L. Krohn, and Ulrich Leben, 144–63. Exh. cat. New York: Bard Graduate Center, The Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, and Yale University Press, 2013.
Helen C. Evans, Mary and Michael Jaharis Curator for Byzantine Art, joined the Museum's staff in 1991 and is responsible for the acquisition, study, and interpretation of the Museum's collection of early Christian, early Jewish, and early-to-late East Christian and Byzantine art. Her exhibitions—including Byzantium and Islam (2012), Byzantium: Faith and Power (2004), and The Glory of Byzantium (1997)—have explored the importance of Byzantine art and its connections beyond its borders. She received her BA from Newcomb College of Tulane University and her MA and PhD from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. She is president elect of the Association of Art Museum Curators and vice president of the International Center for Medieval Art.

Selected Publications:

  • Dalwood. Dexter, Suzanne Preston Blier, Daniela Bohde, Helen C. Evans, Sarah E. Fraser, Thomas Habinek, Tom Huhn, Jeanette Kohl, Niklaus Largier, Peter Mack, and Alex Potts. "Notes from the Field: Mimesis." In The Art Bulletin 95, no. 2 (June 2013): 197–200. New York: College Art Association.
  • Evans, Helen C. "The Restored Section of the Petrine Frieze Sarcophagus in The Metropolitan Museum of Art: A Document of Early Misinterpretations of Christian Iconography." In Ackten des Symposiums "Frühchristliche Sarkophage," edited by Gutram Koch with Rita Amedick, 93–97. Mainz am Rhein: Marburg, 1998. Deutsches Archäologisches Institut, Sarcophag-Studien, band 2, edited by Karin Kirchhainer, 35–37. Mainz am Rhein: Guntram Koch, 2002.
Melanie Holcomb, Curator, attended Smith College and the University of Michigan and is a specialist in ivories and manuscripts. Dr. Holcomb was curator of the exhibition Pen and Parchment (2009) and oversees The Met's collection of early medieval art. Her interest in comparative religion led her to earn a certificate in Jewish art at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. She has taught several courses on Jerusalem and was selected to speak at the Museum's first TEDx conference.
Timothy B. Husband, Curator, has worked in the Department of Medieval Art and The Cloisters for more than 40 years. He studied at the Fogg Museum as an undergraduate at Harvard, received his MA from the Institute of Fine Arts, and completed his doctoral coursework at Columbia. Focusing on the later Middle Ages, mostly in the German-speaking world, his interests include sculpture, tapestry, goldsmiths' work, ceramics, manuscripts, and stained glass in both the secular and ecclesiastical realms. He has organized many exhibitions, including The Treasury of Basel Cathedral (2001) and The Medieval Housebook and the Art of Illumination (1999). His most recent publication is The Art of Illumination: The Limbourg Brothers and the Belles Heures of Jean de France, Duc de Berry.
Charles T. Little, Curator, holds a PhD from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. His main areas of interest are medieval ivory carving and sculpture, and he has published widely in both areas. He co-authored, with Elizabeth C. Parker, The Cloister Cross: Its Art and Meaning (1994), edited the exhibition catalogue Set in Stone: The Face in Medieval Sculpture (2006), and organized the exhibition The Winchester Bible: A Masterpiece of Medieval Art (2014–15). He is a past president of the International Center of Medieval Art.
C. Griffith Mann, Michel David-Weill Curator in Charge, oversees the medieval collection and departmental staff at both The Met Fifth Avenue and The Met Cloisters. Dr. Mann received his BA from Williams College and his PhD from Johns Hopkins University. A specialist in the arts of late medieval Italy, Dr. Mann has curated exhibitions on the medieval cult of relics, the art and archaeology of medieval Novgorod, and 13th-century French manuscript illumination. Before joining the department, Dr. Mann served as deputy director and chief curator at The Cleveland Museum of Art (2008–13) and the director of the curatorial division at The Walters Art Museum (2002–08).

Selected Publications:

  • Mann, C. Griffith. Treasures of Heaven: Saints, Relics and Devotion in Medieval Europe, edited by Martina Bagnoli, Holger Klein, and James Robinson. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2010.
  • ———. "Relics, reliquaries, and the limitations of trecento painting: Naddo Ceccarelli's Reliquary Tabernacle in the Walters Art Museum." In Word and Image 22, no. 3 (2006): 251–259.
  • ———. "Picturing the Bible in the Thirteenth Century." The Book of Kings: Art, War, and the Morgan Library's Medieval Picture Bible, edited by William Noel and Daniel, 38-59. Weiss. London: Third Millenium Publishing Ltd., 2002.
R. Theo Margelony, Associate Administrator, joined the Museum's staff in 1987 and the Department of Medieval Art and The Cloisters in 1993. He's been the associate administrator in the department since 2011, overseeing daily operations and activities and serving as a liaison with other Museum departments and the community. He also works on heraldry, both medieval and modern, and his activities have ranged from developing workshops for children at The Met Cloisters to writing entries in Prague: The Crown of Bohemia 1347–1437 (2005) and designing the heraldic banners in The Mourners: Medieval Tomb Sculpture in the Court of Burgundy (2010). He contributed the blog article "The Garden in Heraldry" to the In Season blog and wrote for its predecessor, The Medieval Garden Enclosed. Follow him on Twitter.