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Staff List

Carlos Aponte, Associate Laboratory Coordinator, graduated with a BSc in industrial microbiology from the University of Puerto Rico Mayagüez, and has conducted protein research with various institutions and research centers, including the National Institutes of Health and NYU Langone Medical Center. Following his passion for art and science, Carlos joined the department in 2015 to further enhance his understanding of how both disciplines naturally overlap. He is currently working with Eric Breitung and Catherine Stephens on performing materials testing for exhibitions. He is also experienced in photography and dedicates his free time to studying historical photographic processes and incorporating them into his work.
Julie Arslanoglu, Research Scientist, joined the department in 2006. She investigates paints, coatings, adhesives, and the organic materials of artworks across all ages using mass-spectrometric and immunological techniques, with emphasis on natural and synthetic polymer identification and degradation. Her education and career bridge the conservation and science worlds, as she holds both an MSc in organic chemistry from the Pennsylvania State University and a postgraduate degree in paintings conservation from the Courtauld Institute of Art. She has worked at the Getty Conservation Institute, the Victoria & Albert Museum, the University of Texas at San Antonio, and the National Institutes of Health. She can be reached at Julie.Arslanoglu@metmuseum.org.
 

Selected Publications:

  • Perets, Ethan Alexander, Agampodi Swarnapali De Silva Indrasekara, Alexis Kurmis, Natalya Atlasevich, Laura Fabris, and Julie Arslanoglu. "Carboxy-Terminated Immuno-SERS Tags Overcome Non-Specific Aggregation for the Robust Detection and Localization of Organic Media in Artworks." In Analyst 140 (2015): 5971–5980.
  • Ren, Fang, Natalya Atlasevich, Brian Baade, John Loike, and Julie Arslanoglu. "Influence of Pigments and Protein Aging on Protein Identification in Historically Representative Casein-Based Paints using Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay." In Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry 408 (2015): 203–215.
  • Arslanoglu, Julie, Silvia A. Centeno, Shawn Digney-Peer, and Isabelle Duvernois. "'Picasso in The Metropolitan Museum of Art': An Investigation of Materials and Techniques." In Journal of the American Institute for Conservation 52, no. 3 (2013): 140–155.
Eric Breitung, Senior Research Scientist, focuses on modern preservation materials and museum environment issues. He earned a PhD in physical organic chemistry from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He worked in the polymer materials laboratory on thin films and coatings at General Electric's Research and Development Center for 10 years, during which he spent one year as an Andrew W. Mellon Fellow at The Met. He then worked on textile dye analysis at the Freer Gallery of the Smithsonian Institution, followed by becoming senior scientist at the Library of Congress. There he focused on modern materials and development of materials analysis tools.
 

Selected Publications:

  • Marquardt, Amy E., Eric M. Breitung, Terry Drayman Weisser, Glenn Gates, and R. J. Phaneuf. "Nanoscale Corrosion Barrier for Silver Museum Artifacts by Atomic Layer Deposition." In ACS Applied Materials & Interface (2016), submitted.
  • Cassidy, Brianna M., Zhenyu Lu, Nathan C. Fuenffinger, Samantha M. Skelton, Eric J. Bringley, Linhchi Nguyen, Michael L. Myrick, Eric M. Breitung, and Stephen L. Morgan. "Minimally Invasive Identification of Degraded Polyester-Urethane Magnetic Tape Using Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and Multivariate Statistics." In Analytical Chemistry 87, no. 18 (2015): 9265–272.
  • Marquardt, Amy E., Eric M. Breitung, Terry Drayman-Weisser, Glenn Gates, and R. J. Phaneuf. "Protecting Silver Cultural Heritage Objects with Atomic Layer Deposited Corrosion Barriers." In Heritage Science 3, no. 1 (2015): 1–12.
Federico Carò, Associate Research Scientist, received his PhD in Earth Science from the University of Pavia, Italy, where he worked on the characterization of natural and artificial building materials for conservation purposes. At The Met, he investigates inorganic materials and techniques employed in artistic production, in close collaboration with conservators and curators. Particularly, his research interests focus on the petrographic and geochemical characterization of stone and other geological materials in provenance studies. Since 2007, he has been involved in the study of Southeast Asian sculptural and architectural materials.
 

Selected Publications:

  • Carò, Federico, Giulia Chiostrini, Elizabeth Cleland, and Nobuko Shibayama. "Redeeming Pieter Coecke van Aelst's Gluttony Tapestry: Learning from Scientific Analysis." In Metropolitan Museum Journal 49 (2014): 151–64.
  • Serotta, Anna, and Federico Carò. "Evidence for the Use of Corundum Abrasive in Egypt from the Great Aten Temple at Amarna." In Horizon 14 (2014): 2–4.
  • Carò, Federico, and Janet Douglas. "Nature and Provenance of the Sandstone Used for Bayon Style Sculptures Produced During the Reign of Jayavarman VII." In Journal of Archaeological Science 40 (2013): 723–734.
Silvia A. Centeno, Research Scientist, collaborates with scientists, conservators, and curators in the investigation of artists' materials and techniques and of deterioration processes in paintings, photographs, and works of art on paper. She has published and lectured on a number of topics, including pigment- and platinum-based photographic processes, daguerreotypes, heavy-metal soap deterioration in oil paintings, modern paints, early lithographic inks, and Renaissance paintings. She received a PhD in Chemistry from Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Argentina, and started at The Met as an L.W. Frohlich Fellow in the Department of Objects Conservation to study gilding techniques in Precolumbian metalwork. She can be reached at silvia.centeno@metmuseum.org.
 

Selected Publications:

Anna Cesaratto, Research Associate, joined the department in 2016 as a staff member for the Network Initiative for Conservation Science (NICS), a pilot program aiming to support museums in the New York area that do not have widespread access to a state-of-the-art scientific research facility. After earning a PhD in applied physics from Politecnico di Milano, Italy, she has been an Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Conservation Science at The Met since 2014. Her research interests range from visible reflectance hyperspectral imaging to spectral and time-resolved luminescence imaging spectroscopy and vibrational spectroscopy techniques applied to the study of traditional and modern pigment materials and their degradation products.
 

Selected Publications:

  • Cesaratto, Anna, John R. Lombardi, and Marco Leona. "Tracking Photo-Degradation of Triarylmethane Dyes with Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy." Journal of Raman Spectroscopy (2016). doi: 10.1002/jrs.5056.
  • Cesaratto, Anna, Marco Leona, John R. Lombardi, Daniela Comelli, Austin Nevin, and Pablo Londero. "Detection of Organic Colorants in Historical Painting Layers Using UV Laser Ablation Surface-Enhanced Raman Microspectroscopy." In Angewandte Chemie International Edition 53 (2014): 14373–14377
  • Cesaratto, Anna, Austin Nevin, Gianluca Valentini, Luigi Brambilla, Chiara Castiglioni, Lucia Toniolo, Maria Fratelli, and Daniela Comelli. "A Novel Classification Method for Multispectral Imaging Combined with Portable Raman Spectroscopy for the Analysis of a Painting by Vincent Van Gogh." In Applied Spectroscopy 67, no. 11 (2013): 1234–1241.
Marco Leona, David H. Koch Scientist in Charge, studied in Italy, where he obtained a laurea in chimica (MSc, Chemistry) and a PhD in crystallography and mineralogy from the Universita' degli Studi di Pavia. Prior to joining The Met, he worked at the Freer Gallery of Art in Washington D.C., and at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA). He pioneered the use of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to investigate natural and synthetic dyes in works of art. Outside of his work at the Museum, he teaches analytical chemistry at the Conservation Center of New York University's Institute of Fine Art.
 

Selected Publications:

Kathy Miller, Manager for Administration, began her career at The Met as a special assistant to the chairman of the Department of Paintings Conservation. She was formerly executive director of Horizon Concerts. She holds a BS from St. John's University and an MA in arts management from New York University.
Federica Pozzi, Associate Research Scientist, leads the Network Initiative for Conservation Science (NICS), a pilot program aiming to support New York–area museums that do not have access to a state-of-the-art scientific research facility. Federica earned her PhD in chemical sciences from the University of Milan, Italy, and, as part of her doctoral studies, she spent one year at The Met as a visiting scholar. After conducting post-doctoral research at The City College of New York and The Met, Federica held an Andrew W. Mellon fellowship in conservation science at the Art Institute of Chicago, and then joined the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum as the first scientist on staff.
 

Selected Publications:

  • Pozzi, Federica, Stephanie Zaleski, Francesca Casadio, Marco Leona, John R. Lombardi, and Richard P. Van Duyne. "Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy: Using Nanoparticles to Detect Trace Amounts of Colorants in Works of Art." In Nanoscience and Cultural Heritage, edited by Ph. Dillmann, L. Bellot-Gurlet, I. Nenner, 161–204. Paris: Atlantis Press, 2016.
  • Pozzi, Federica, Julie Arslanoglu, Federico Carò, and Carol Stringari. "Conquering Space with Matter: A Technical Study of Alberto Burri's Materials and Techniques." In Applied Physics A 122, no. 10 (2016): 1–15.
  • Pozzi, Federica, Lauren K. Chang, and Francesca Casadio. "The Navajo Blankets from the Art Institute of Chicago Collection: Technical Analysis of Yarn and Weavings Coupled with Dye Identification by Normal Raman and Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS)." In Preprints ICOM-CC 17th Triennial Conference, Building Strong Culture through Conservation, 17–19 September 2014, Melbourne, Australia, edited by J. Bridgland. Paris: International Council of Museums, 2014.
Adriana Rizzo, Associate Research Scientist, has worked at The Met since 2004, conducting analysis of materials from art objects of different periods and cultures to provide insight into their manufacture and inform their conservation. She is interested in the study of organic materials and their degradation, as well as conservation-related issues. The analytical techniques she uses include molecular spectroscopy and chromatography-mass spectrometry. She holds an MSc in industrial chemistry from Ca' Foscari University of Venice, Italy, and a postgraduate diploma in the conservation of easel paintings from the Courtauld Institute of Art in London, UK.
 

Selected Publications:

  • Rizzo, Adriana, Mechthild Baumeister, Beth Edelstein, Arianna Gambirasi, and Anke Scharrahs, with contributions by Julia Schultz and Daniel P. Kirby. "A Rediscovered Opulence: The Surface Decoration of an Early 18th-Century Damascene Reception Room at The Metropolitan Museum of Art." In Architectural Paint Research: Sharing Information, Sharing Decisions, edited by Rachel Faulding and Sue Thomas, 117–31. London: Archetype Books, 2014.
  • Tsukada, Masahiko, Adriana Rizzo and Clara Granzotto. "A New Strategy for Assessing Off-Gassing from Museum Materials: Air Sampling in Oddy Test Vessels." In AIC news 37, no. 1 (2012): 1, 3–7.
  • Rizzo, Adriana, Nobuko Shibayama, and Daniel P. Kirby. "A Multi-analytical Approach for the Identification of Aloe as a Colorant in Oil–resin Varnishes." Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry 399, no. 9 (2010): 3093–107.
Nobuko Shibayama, Associate Research Scientist, joined The Met in 1999. She received a PhD in applied science for functionality from the Postgraduate School of the Kyoto Institute of Technology, Japan, in 1992 and a diploma in textile conservation from the Courtauld Institute of Art, London, in 1995. The focus of her work involves the use of liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry techniques to identify dyes and organic lake pigments of art objects.
 

Selected Publications:

Catherine Stephens, Associate Research Scientist, holds a PhD in macromolecular science and engineering and BA degrees in both chemistry and art history. Before joining the department in 2016, her specialty was studying the degradation mechanisms and structure-property relationships of polymeric materials (e.g., paper, cellulose acetate, foamed epoxies) found in museums. Her work at The Met focuses on evaluating environmental conditions, identifying potentially hazardous chemical compounds found in materials proposed for use in display and storage, and developing novel analytical techniques that ensure the longevity of the collection.
 

Selected Publications:

  • Stephens, Catherine, and Amy Williams. "Artificial Aging of Paper-Based Cores Wrapped in Various Isolating Layers for Use as Archival Storage Supports." In AIC: Research and Technical Studies 4, no. 4 (2013): 105–134 .
  • Stephens, Catherine, B. Shrestha, Hannah R. Morris, Mark E. Bier, Paul M. Whitmore, and A. Vertes. "Monitoring Cellulose Degradation with Desorption Electrospray Ionization- and Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization- Mass Spectrometry." In Analyst 135 (2010): 2434–2444.
  • Stephens, Catherine, Paul M. Whitmore, Hannah R. Morris, and Mark E. Bier. "Hydrolysis of the Amorphous Cellulose in Cotton-Based Paper." In Biomacromolecules 9, no. 4 (2008): 1093–1099.
Mark Wypyski, Scientist Emeritus, graduated from Haverford College with a combined BS/BA degree, and earned graduate degrees in science, art history, and art conservation from Rutgers University and New York University's Institute of Fine Arts. Having worked at The Met since 1986, he specializes in the application of electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis for the characterization of art and archaeological materials. His many research projects over the years have concentrated mainly on compositional analysis of ancient and historic glasses and enamels.
 

Selected Publications:

  • Wypyski, Mark. "Chemical Analysis of Early Islamic Glass from Nishapur." In Journal of Glass Studies 57 (2015): 121–136.
  • ———. "Compositional Study of Medieval Islamic Enameled Glass from the Metropolitan Museum of Art." In Metropolitan Museum Studies in Art, Science, and Technology 1 (2010): 109–132.
  • ———. "The Neptune Pendant: Renaissance Jewel or Nineteenth-Century Invention?" In The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin 67, no. 1 (2009): 33–39.