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Mummy with a Painted Mask Depicting a Woman Holding a Goblet

Period:
Roman Period
Date:
A.D. 270–280
Geography:
From Egypt, Upper Egypt; Thebes, Deir el-Bahri, Temple of Mentuhotep II, forecourt, shallow grave just west of Naville's old house, MMA 1923–24
Medium:
Plaster, paint, linen, human remains
Dimensions:
l. 155 cm (61 in)
Credit Line:
Rogers Fund, 1925
Accession Number:
25.3.219
  • Description

    Numerous burials from the Roman Period were found in the forecourts of the temple of King Mentuhotep II (ca. 2061-2010 b.c.) The king's temple was no longer in use but the nearby temple of Hatshepsut served as a sanctuary to the Greek god Asklepios and the Egyptian deified sages Imhotep and Amenhotep, son of Hapu. Pilgrims would sleep there to seek magical healing of ailments, and a burial nearby would be considered beneficial to the deceased.
    The wrapping and cover of this mummy are representative of customs prevalent at the time of the last burials according to the Egyptian tradition. The woman's wreathed head rests upon a gold pillow. Her white tunic has broad black clavi (stripes), and she wears a mantle with greenish black orbiculi (circular ornaments), ornaments popular from the late third century.

  • Provenance

    Museum excavations 1923–24. Acquired by the Museum in the division of finds, 1925.

  • See also
    What
    Where
    When
    In the Museum
    Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History
547758

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