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In Season

Tales and a Tune of the Willow

Christina Alphonso, Administrator, The Cloisters

Posted: Thursday, April 16, 2015

Within the past few weeks the grip of a long winter has loosened, and we have turned our attention toward our trees. Recent visitors might have noticed that our consulting arborist was hard at work pollarding the crab apples in the Cuxa Cloister. She'll have moved on to the trees in the orchard and our beloved veteran fruit trees in the Bonnefont Herb Garden by the time this post is published. We'll also be undertaking the first coppicing of our willows, a topic introduced in my previous post.

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In Season

A Blanket of Gold

Caleb Leech, Managing Horticulturist, The Cloisters Museum and Gardens

Posted: Thursday, April 9, 2015

The winter aconite (Eranthis hyemalis) has just revealed its cheerful, yellow blooms. Most years, winter aconite is one of the earliest winter-blooming bulbs, appearing in January and February, but this year's cold temperatures have delayed its arrival.

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In Season

Here I Sette My Thynge to Sprynge

Caleb Leech, Managing Horticulturist, The Cloisters Museum and Gardens

Posted: Friday, March 13, 2015

Although the vernal equinox is mere days away, this week is our first taste of spring. For most people, the start of spring is a celebrated event that signals longer days and warmer temperatures. In medieval Europe, spring was considered a highly auspicious time; in many parts of Western Europe, it marked the beginning of a new year and included one of the most important occasions, the Feast of the Annunciation (see "Lady Day" [March 25, 2011] on The Medieval Garden Enclosed).

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In Season

A Treasury for The Cloisters

Christine E. Brennan, Senior Research Associate, Department of Medieval Art and The Cloisters

Posted: Thursday, March 5, 2015

Today, visitors to The Cloisters museum and gardens marvel at precious works of gold, silver, and ivory in the Treasury. But this richly furnished gallery was not part of the original design of The Cloisters. It owes its inception to two individuals: Museum Curator James Rorimer and the art dealer Joseph Brummer (both pictured above).

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In Season

Whence Willow Wattle?

Christina Alphonso, Administrator, The Cloisters

Posted: Thursday, February 19, 2015

An attractive feature of the Bonnefont Herb Garden in winter and early spring is the distinctive wattle used in the raised beds. Medieval gardens, orchards, and property boundaries were enclosed in a variety of ways, including by hedges and wattle fences. In the Bonnefont Herb Garden, our wattle, or hurdles (pictured above), of various heights edge the beds and support the plants. The hurdles and supports are made from willow from the Somerset Levels (wetlands) in England; willow has been grown and woven in Somerset since the late Iron Age. Willow work is still commercially produced in the region and the same family has made our wattle elements for many years.

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In Season

Snowy Days at The Cloisters

Andrew Winslow, Senior Departmental Technician, The Cloisters museum and gardens

Posted: Friday, February 13, 2015

After trudging to work through Fort Tryon Park in the morning after a heavy snowfall, the first thing I do is grab my camera and head straight to some of my favorite spots in The Cloisters museum and gardens. First, up to the top of the tower to look out over the park, the river, and the George Washington Bridge.

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In Season

A Tale of Two Collections: The Cloisters and Glencairn Museums

Julia Perratore, Mellon Curatorial Fellow, Department of Medieval Art and The Cloisters

Posted: Thursday, February 5, 2015

The Cloisters museum and gardens has many devotees, but I wonder how many of its visitors know about the Glencairn Museum, located in Bryn Athyn, just outside of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Glencairn, like The Cloisters, is home to an excellent collection of medieval art on view in a building inspired by medieval architecture. As a current Met fellow and former Glencairn fellow, I have had ample opportunity to study the histories of these two marvelous collections, both of which took shape during the early twentieth century. Together they constitute an important chapter in the story of collecting medieval art in the United States, and I am continually impressed by the close relationship between them.

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In Season

A Winter Walk through Fort Tryon Park

Jonathan Landsman, Landscape Coordinator, New York City Department of Parks and Recreation

Posted: Friday, January 30, 2015

"How do you get to The Cloisters?" For me and the two full-time gardeners charged with the care of Fort Tryon Park's sixty-seven acres of forest and two historic gardens, this is the question we are asked the most. Our answer changes from season to season: the paths don't move, but the flowers do, and we always guide visitors through the most beautiful experience the season offers.

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In Season

Dyeing for Color

Carly Still, Assistant Horticulturist, The Cloisters Museum and Gardens

Posted: Thursday, January 22, 2015

In the midst of ice and wind, I retreat to the warmth of the indoors at The Cloisters museum and gardens. I long for growth, and daydream about the upcoming spring. And I write about color now to invigorate myself against a possible winter slump.

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In Season

New Glasses for the Table

Tim Husband, Curator, Department of Medieval Art and The Cloisters

Posted: Friday, January 16, 2015

The Cloisters museum and gardens came relatively late to the collection of late medieval glass vessels. The reasons are twofold: first, because very few of these objects have survived—they were everyday household objects, and fragile ones at that—and second, because collectors and scholars were slow to appreciate the elegant simplicity and skillful fabrication of these modest, utilitarian objects. The first glass vessel entered The Cloisters Collection in 1977 and, like all those to follow, was a product of the German-speaking world of central Europe, a vast region that supported an extensive glass-making industry. The three recent acquisitions discussed here significantly enhance the collection's holdings of these appealing tablewares.

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About this Blog

In Season features all the latest news about The Cloisters museum and gardens, the branch of the Museum in northern Manhattan devoted to the art and architecture of medieval Europe.